Oman looking for eco-desalination

Oman looking for eco-desalination
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Published April 15th, 2013 - 08:38 GMT via SyndiGate.info

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Water production in the sultanate is set to rise steadily in the three years to 2016
Water production in the sultanate is set to rise steadily in the three years to 2016
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Water Procurement Co
,
Abdullah al Niyami
,
Brian Wood
,
Ministry of Oil and Gas
,
Public Authority for Electricity and Water
,
Public Authority for Electricity

Energy efficient methods for water desalination are increasingly being adopted in the sultanate as the increase in the number of projects may soon have an impact on energy requirements in the country, according to authorities.

Being an energy intensive process, seawater desalination requires more energy than any other water-treatment methods, which can add to the problems of power generation existing in the country.

According to a recent report by Business Monitor International (BMI), water production in the sultanate is set to rise steadily in the three years to 2016, when it will peak with an annual 2.8 per cent increase.

According to officials, energy efficient technology for water desalination is being adopted for new plants in Oman, which will ensure lower operation and maintenance costs.

"Due to the exponential increase in the number of water desalination projects, energy consumption is also rising, which can be worrisome. But we are trying to adopt renewable and green-energy techniques of international standards to support energy saving and lower costs," said Abdullah al Niyami, senior manager for water operations at the Public Authority for Electricity and Water (PAEW).

By 2022, BMI envisages, Oman will enjoy total water production of 58,440mn gallons, an increase of more than 11,000mn gallons over the existing capacity.

Brian Wood, manager for planning and economics at Oman Power and Water Procurement Co (OPWP), said, "Power and water requirements are increasing, hence consumption is also on the rise. To provide water to communities replacing tanker supply is part of the national strategy.
"There may be an impact on energy requirements, which is absolutely true. But when we adopt the most efficient technologies for desalinating water, we are managing energy consumption better." 

"We are always enquiring with the Ministry of Oil and Gas on limits to development and if at any point we have to look at some other sources for importing energy, which is again uncertain," added Wood.

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