Nothing to declare but his wit - Bassem Youssef's on a roll

Published April 1st, 2013 - 15:56 GMT

Rate Article:

 
PRINT Send Mail
comment (0)
Back in January, Egyptian preacher, Abu Islam Ahmed Abdallah, launched a catty attack on Bassem Youssef’s manhood. The Islamist said the Egyptian funnyman is so “pretty” he should cover up with a full-face veil. Bassem responded: 'All of a sudden I was afraid of turning people on.'
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: Back in January, Egyptian preacher, Abu Islam Ahmed Abdallah, launched a catty attack on Bassem Youssef’s manhood. The Islamist said the Egyptian funnyman is so “pretty” he should cover up with a full-face veil. Bassem responded: "All of a sudden I was afraid of turning people on."

In one episode, Bassem made comedy gold out of the famous “get me a man!' statement by Sheikh Mohammad Sha’ban, to which our comedy-hero replied “Get him a man, I have no time to meet him!' Sha’ban’s considered reply? Bassem is not a man. BOOM
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: In one episode, Bassem made comedy gold out of the famous “get me a man!" statement by Sheikh Mohammad Sha’ban, to which our comedy-hero replied “Get him a man, I have no time to meet him!" Sha’ban’s considered reply? Bassem is not a man. BOOM

Morsi is often the butt of Bassem’s jokes. No presidential blunder goes unnoticed by the Egyptian funnyman, who pokes fun at everything from Morsi’s dodgy English to his even dodgier threads. On his way into the courthouse, Bassem took aim at the President, wearing a comedy hat resembling the one worn by Morsi on his recent trip to Pakistan.
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: Morsi is often the butt of Bassem’s jokes. No presidential blunder goes unnoticed by the Egyptian funnyman, who pokes fun at everything from Morsi’s dodgy English to his even dodgier threads. On his way into the courthouse, Bassem took aim at the President, wearing a comedy hat resembling the one worn by Morsi on his recent trip to Pakistan.

Never one to hold his tongue in check, Youssef accused followers of Hazem Abu Ismaeel of being terrorists, claiming that they did not scare him, but in a his dry  wit, pleaded with them to not burn down his TV studio.
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: Never one to hold his tongue in check, Youssef accused followers of Hazem Abu Ismaeel of being terrorists, claiming that they did not scare him, but in a his dry wit, pleaded with them to not burn down his TV studio.

Mohammed Hassan, the firebrand Salafist, is often the target for Youssef’s dark humour. In one monologue, our satirical hero asked, “Where has Islam been? I do not recognize  any idols!” Not one to take things laying down, Hassan replied with a diatribe saying Youssef’s words were more dangerous than bullets.
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: Mohammed Hassan, the firebrand Salafist, is often the target for Youssef’s dark humour. In one monologue, our satirical hero asked, “Where has Islam been? I do not recognize any idols!” Not one to take things laying down, Hassan replied with a diatribe saying Youssef’s words were more dangerous than bullets.

After the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, Isam Al-Aryan, urged the Jews of Egypt currently residing in Israel, to return home, our mischievous Jon Stewart-esque hero, claimed that the north African country doesn’t have space for them all.
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: After the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, Isam Al-Aryan, urged the Jews of Egypt currently residing in Israel, to return home, our mischievous Jon Stewart-esque hero, claimed that the north African country doesn’t have space for them all.

The next target for Bassem’s comedy crosshair was Khayrat El-Shater, who once famously proclaimed that he wouldn’t be running for the Presidency. Bassem let his thumbs do the talking, tweeting that the Muslim Brotherhood weren’t after the presidency, but Satan is Shater (good). Al-Shater’s son was so incensed he made a video reply!
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: The next target for Bassem’s comedy crosshair was Khayrat El-Shater, who once famously proclaimed that he wouldn’t be running for the Presidency. Bassem let his thumbs do the talking, tweeting that the Muslim Brotherhood weren’t after the presidency, but Satan is Shater (good). Al-Shater’s son was so incensed he made a video reply!

Bassem was hauled before prosecutors on charges of mocking Morsi and Islam, after he (hilariously) declared the government had files for everyone who prayed. Hundreds of his fans came out to support him at court.
  Pause  
  Play  

Image 1 of 8: Bassem was hauled before prosecutors on charges of mocking Morsi and Islam, after he (hilariously) declared the government had files for everyone who prayed. Hundreds of his fans came out to support him at court.

Hailing from the nation that prides itself on its rambunctious sense of humour, Bassem Youssef has kept Egypt's liberals laughing throughout a tricky period of transition.

The self-styled Jon Stewart of Egyptian television has firmly stuck his satirical boot into the country's leadership, as they struggle with economic and political challenges in the tumultuous post-revolutionary climate.

A demi-god among his supporters, Bassem's polarising brand of humour has made him enemies among the country's conservative Islamist political class. Public denouncements of the star were followed by an arrest warrant being issued by the state prosecutor-general.

Arriving at court in an oversized imitation Morsi hat, Youssef kept his legions of followers updated throughout the session with a series of humorous tweets.

We take a look at the controversial moments in the career of the man who's swiftly becoming a national legend.

Advertisement

Add a new comment

 avatar