In the time of Morsi: back to the new President and his Morsimeter

Published July 31st, 2012 - 14:38 GMT

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Religion & politics meet great expectations, accompanied by lurking aggro. For the 1st new Islamic president of the Arab Spring, hopes run high but can Morsi deliver? These are big 1st-time boots to step into. Revolutionary Egypt stands by Morsi but outer devotion masks hidden frustration close to the surface. (image source: Melissa Carlson)
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Image 1 of 8: Religion & politics meet great expectations, accompanied by lurking aggro. For the 1st new Islamic president of the Arab Spring, hopes run high but can Morsi deliver? These are big 1st-time boots to step into. Revolutionary Egypt stands by Morsi but outer devotion masks hidden frustration close to the surface. (image source: Melissa Carlson)

'All you need is love': says Mohammed Morsi on the radio in a post-Iftar phone-in slot: 'Nothing you can do, that can't be done?' Time will tell for Morsi and those 'Morsimeter' watchmen will probably not hold-back their verdict. His exact words, Beatles lyrics aside, 'Social justice can be achieved by love'. We'll see.
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Image 1 of 8: "All you need is love": says Mohammed Morsi on the radio in a post-Iftar phone-in slot: 'Nothing you can do, that can't be done?" Time will tell for Morsi and those "Morsimeter" watchmen will probably not hold-back their verdict. His exact words, Beatles lyrics aside, "Social justice can be achieved by love". We'll see.

After love comes obscenity. F*** SCAF: Some people may have voted strategically, just to keep SCAF out of power. The prevailing issue still rests with SCAF wielding too much power in Egypt. There is no sign of Morsi containing them or ridding the country of their sinister grip. People want to see SCAF snuffed.
(image source: Melissa Carlson)
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Image 1 of 8: After love comes obscenity. F*** SCAF: Some people may have voted strategically, just to keep SCAF out of power. The prevailing issue still rests with SCAF wielding too much power in Egypt. There is no sign of Morsi containing them or ridding the country of their sinister grip. People want to see SCAF snuffed. (image source: Melissa Carlson)

Just 30 days into the 100 day ticking 'Morsimeter' - the people-run initiative to track Egypt's main man - checking in with the online app, he's 'wasted' no time on a drive to keep the streets clean. Morsimeter flags 64 promises, with 63 to deliver. Egyptians know good things come to those who wait: and a cleaner Egypt is not half a bad thing.
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Image 1 of 8: Just 30 days into the 100 day ticking "Morsimeter" - the people-run initiative to track Egypt's main man - checking in with the online app, he's 'wasted' no time on a drive to keep the streets clean. Morsimeter flags 64 promises, with 63 to deliver. Egyptians know good things come to those who wait: and a cleaner Egypt is not half a bad thing.

Leaving corruption & grime behind: a clean slate or a load of rubbish? He's piled on the promises but so far Morsi's only accomplished an awareness campaign for garbage disposal. He's put waste-clearing firmly on the agenda, announcing via Friday prayer mics that 'leaving garbage out on the streets makes you culpable of harming fellow citizens.'
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Image 1 of 8: Leaving corruption & grime behind: a clean slate or a load of rubbish? He's piled on the promises but so far Morsi's only accomplished an awareness campaign for garbage disposal. He's put waste-clearing firmly on the agenda, announcing via Friday prayer mics that 'leaving garbage out on the streets makes you culpable of harming fellow citizens.'

All quiet on the Tahrir front? This Tahrir effigy says otherwise. While the square looks serene, there are rumblings of discontent close to the surface. Mubarak's cronies have retained positions and SCAF are still having an underhand role in this new democracy. The old regime hangs perilously over the revolution. (image source: Melissa Carlson)
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Image 1 of 8: All quiet on the Tahrir front? This Tahrir effigy says otherwise. While the square looks serene, there are rumblings of discontent close to the surface. Mubarak's cronies have retained positions and SCAF are still having an underhand role in this new democracy. The old regime hangs perilously over the revolution. (image source: Melissa Carlson)

Employment is still the 'big issue': Morsi has promised to increase the number of jobs but for now the scene is much the same for Egyptians in need of work. Migrants are still pouring into neighboring Jordan due to salaries that will translate well in Egyptian Pounds. Laborers in Jordan and Lebanon have been in no hurry to return home for Morsi.
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Image 1 of 8: Employment is still the 'big issue': Morsi has promised to increase the number of jobs but for now the scene is much the same for Egyptians in need of work. Migrants are still pouring into neighboring Jordan due to salaries that will translate well in Egyptian Pounds. Laborers in Jordan and Lebanon have been in no hurry to return home for Morsi.

Challenge to come? Elbaradei could unite the liberals against Morsi, as word on the street says he's putting together a polticial party, drumming up support and 'bums' for seats in parliament. Unrest may be lurking beneath the surface. The revolution may not have come to a satisfactory rest yet.
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Image 1 of 8: Challenge to come? Elbaradei could unite the liberals against Morsi, as word on the street says he's putting together a polticial party, drumming up support and 'bums' for seats in parliament. Unrest may be lurking beneath the surface. The revolution may not have come to a satisfactory rest yet.

After Syria, the Olympics, Ramadan, Syria, Ramadan, and still more Syria and Olympics it's about time we checked back in with Egypt and the nascent democracy's new main man Mohammed Morsi. A catch-up quite overdue with the country whose revolution kept us on our toes and then to everyone's astonishment delivered cleanly and safely a new fresh-bearded President in place of the old ousted rotten dictator. 

Included in the Morsi-review is the first reading of the Morsimeter and a general snap-shot of new-born democratic Egypt at one month-old. Whatever happened to SCAF and a country's discontent?

Morsi's performance rating, the month after

Whatever happened to the "Morsimeter" - the ultimate people power gizmo to monitor this democracy's promise-making president? Al Bawaba thought it would play the gas man and deliver a first reading from the wired-up democracy tool.

The results one month along are not obviously inspiring by any means. But promising, yes, sure. After all, expectations should be managed when nobody had any right to expect so much from the leader of the country which never stops--never stops giving its government challenges, that is.

So far so good: President Mohammed Morsi is setting wrongs to right with Egypt's once less that 'clean' reputation. He may be one problem down and 63 more to go, but he's also "got 63 problems [and] but garbage ain't one!".

 

Share have your voice on the performance of Mohammed Morsi? Do you think he will be living up to his promises as first democratic leader for Egypt? Are the people or yourself happy with the new President? 

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