Morsi meter tick-tocks: On his way out, the final countdown

Published July 1st, 2013 - 08:47 GMT

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Image 1 of 10: Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians flood the streets outside the presidential palace in Cairo (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Reports of sexual harassment didn't stop these women from making their voices heard in Cairo (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Egyptians return to Tahrir square, calling for the downfall of another Egyptian President (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: There's nothing like a giant flag to get you all fired up and nationalistic (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Mass mid-protest prayer session in the iconic Tahrir Square (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Flag waving and victory signs are the order of the day at the top of the electricity pole (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: He'd probably paint that X right across Morsi's face if he had the chance (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Subtle nod to a former Egyptian President there (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Things get heated as protestors set fire to the Muslim Brotherhood HQ (AFP)

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Image 1 of 10: Egyptians as far as the eye can see (AFP)

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi might be wondering, “How the hell did I get here?”

The one-year president is facing the same kind of turmoil that his predecessor faced as hundreds of thousands of protesters filled the country’s villages and cities on Sunday.

The protests have sparked violence throughout Egypt between pro and anti government supporters.

According to TIME, roughly 500 men hurling stones and Molotov cocktails set the Morsi backed Muslim Brotherhood headquarters on fire. Four people were killed during the clash in upper Egypt. Another 220 were said to be injured nationwide, the publication reported.

Another five were shot dead in towns just south of Cairo, according to the Guardian.

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Despite Morsi’s victory in 2012, dissatisfaction for the president is running rife, creating the “Tamarrod” movement, or Rebellion campaign. The rebels have collected more than 22 million signatures that are calling for Morsi’s resignation and for the start of a new election.

Yet the president - along with the Muslim Brotherhood - refuse to budge. The government has deployed thousands of troops to government buildings throughout Egypt.

Just one day earlier, Morsi told the Guardian that he “rejected opposition calls for early presidential elections.”

"If we changed someone in office who [was elected] according to constitutional legitimacy – well, there will people or opponents opposing the new president too, and a week or a month later, they will ask him to step down," Morsi told the London based newspaper.

"There is no room for any talk against this constitutional legitimacy,” he added. “There can be demonstrations and people expressing their opinions. But what's critical in all this is the adoption and application of the constitution. This is the critical point."

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