The People vs SCAF: the old cogs of power still turning

Published June 18th, 2012 - 17:51 GMT

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As the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) announced its presidential triumph with Mohammed Mursi taking the throne of Egypt, all eyes were on the power struggle playing out between the military and the people's choice. While Shafiq is a defeated man, his cause is still being championed by his military friends who reign supreme. This time, Egypt's winner may not be taking all. Is Mursi just an Islamic figurehead to the real power at play? Continue reading below »

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Today the Muslim Brotherhood, tomorrow the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) : Mohammed Mursi wins but who's really in charge? Some might say Egypt has returned to the military coup of the 1950s as all signs seem to suggest SCAF is elbowing its way into power.
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Image 1 of 9:  1 / 9Today the Muslim Brotherhood, tomorrow the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) : Mohammed Mursi wins but who's really in charge? Some might say Egypt has returned to the military coup of the 1950s as all signs seem to suggest SCAF is elbowing its way into power.

Enlarge
No trial for all Mubarak's men: It may have been a life sentence for Mubarak but his cronies are still out and about. While the figurehead was excised & punished, the wheels of power are still in motion as these men have either stood protracted trials or no trial at all. Hussein Salem, an advisor & confidante to Mubarak is one who got away.
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Image 2 of 9:  2 / 9No trial for all Mubarak's men: It may have been a life sentence for Mubarak but his cronies are still out and about. While the figurehead was excised & punished, the wheels of power are still in motion as these men have either stood protracted trials or no trial at all. Hussein Salem, an advisor & confidante to Mubarak is one who got away.

Enlarge
No justice, no peace, as Midan Tahrir or protest central flares up on account of the same old grievances: mass protests kick off again in Tahrir Square when Mubarak's old guard escape court without sentence. As people start to get the distinct impression that the old regime still wields too much influence, calls come for Shafiq to step down.
Reduce

Image 3 of 9:  3 / 9No justice, no peace, as Midan Tahrir or protest central flares up on account of the same old grievances: mass protests kick off again in Tahrir Square when Mubarak's old guard escape court without sentence. As people start to get the distinct impression that the old regime still wields too much influence, calls come for Shafiq to step down.

Enlarge
The first complaint about military conduct in the elections: presidential contender Sabbahi says on May 29th that almost a million Shafiq votes came from army personnel who were not eligible to vote. Shafiq himself has the military background entrenched in Egypt's ruling elite since the 1950s, common to the succession of Presidents to date.
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Image 4 of 9:  4 / 9The first complaint about military conduct in the elections: presidential contender Sabbahi says on May 29th that almost a million Shafiq votes came from army personnel who were not eligible to vote. Shafiq himself has the military background entrenched in Egypt's ruling elite since the 1950s, common to the succession of Presidents to date.

Enlarge
14th June: the Supreme Constitutional Court re-visits Shafiq's eligibility to stand for the presidency, according to the law that stipulates no Mubarak aides in power for at least 10 years.
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Image 5 of 9:  5 / 914th June: the Supreme Constitutional Court re-visits Shafiq's eligibility to stand for the presidency, according to the law that stipulates no Mubarak aides in power for at least 10 years.

Enlarge
June 14th's parliamentary meltdown: The same day of the ruling that keeps Shafiq in the race, a third of the Islamist parliament is dissolved by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). Once capture in a slumber session, the parliament has now affectively nodded off as a third of it - the upper assembly- has been dissolved.
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Image 6 of 9:  6 / 9June 14th's parliamentary meltdown: The same day of the ruling that keeps Shafiq in the race, a third of the Islamist parliament is dissolved by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). Once capture in a slumber session, the parliament has now affectively nodded off as a third of it - the upper assembly- has been dissolved.

Enlarge
It's a double whammy for the people who battled to keep the military at bay: with parliament dissolved, the Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) rule Shafiq eligible to stand. A fleeting moment of triumph for Shafiq, now defeated.
Reduce

Image 7 of 9:  7 / 9It's a double whammy for the people who battled to keep the military at bay: with parliament dissolved, the Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) rule Shafiq eligible to stand. A fleeting moment of triumph for Shafiq, now defeated.

Enlarge
June 18th: The Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) panic that Shafiq won't win so amend the law through Article 56, guaranteeing that they still have power over the army and can arrest civilians with impunity. Flash-back to Khaled Said. Back to the old square one or back to Tahrir full circle?
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Image 8 of 9:  8 / 9June 18th: The Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) panic that Shafiq won't win so amend the law through Article 56, guaranteeing that they still have power over the army and can arrest civilians with impunity. Flash-back to Khaled Said. Back to the old square one or back to Tahrir full circle?

Enlarge
Khaled Said's revolutionary powerhouse Facebook campaign (We are all Khaled Said) is from today the platform that is saying NO to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF).
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Image 9 of 9:  9 / 9Khaled Said's revolutionary powerhouse Facebook campaign (We are all Khaled Said) is from today the platform that is saying NO to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF).

Enlarge

1

Today the Muslim Brotherhood, tomorrow the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) : Mohammed Mursi wins but who's really in charge? Some might say Egypt has returned to the military coup of the 1950s as all signs seem to suggest SCAF is elbowing its way into power.

Image 1 of 9Today the Muslim Brotherhood, tomorrow the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) : Mohammed Mursi wins but who's really in charge? Some might say Egypt has returned to the military coup of the 1950s as all signs seem to suggest SCAF is elbowing its way into power.

2

No trial for all Mubarak's men: It may have been a life sentence for Mubarak but his cronies are still out and about. While the figurehead was excised & punished, the wheels of power are still in motion as these men have either stood protracted trials or no trial at all. Hussein Salem, an advisor & confidante to Mubarak is one who got away.

Image 2 of 9No trial for all Mubarak's men: It may have been a life sentence for Mubarak but his cronies are still out and about. While the figurehead was excised & punished, the wheels of power are still in motion as these men have either stood protracted trials or no trial at all. Hussein Salem, an advisor & confidante to Mubarak is one who got away.

3

No justice, no peace, as Midan Tahrir or protest central flares up on account of the same old grievances: mass protests kick off again in Tahrir Square when Mubarak's old guard escape court without sentence. As people start to get the distinct impression that the old regime still wields too much influence, calls come for Shafiq to step down.

Image 3 of 9No justice, no peace, as Midan Tahrir or protest central flares up on account of the same old grievances: mass protests kick off again in Tahrir Square when Mubarak's old guard escape court without sentence. As people start to get the distinct impression that the old regime still wields too much influence, calls come for Shafiq to step down.

4

The first complaint about military conduct in the elections: presidential contender Sabbahi says on May 29th that almost a million Shafiq votes came from army personnel who were not eligible to vote. Shafiq himself has the military background entrenched in Egypt's ruling elite since the 1950s, common to the succession of Presidents to date.

Image 4 of 9The first complaint about military conduct in the elections: presidential contender Sabbahi says on May 29th that almost a million Shafiq votes came from army personnel who were not eligible to vote. Shafiq himself has the military background entrenched in Egypt's ruling elite since the 1950s, common to the succession of Presidents to date.

5

14th June: the Supreme Constitutional Court re-visits Shafiq's eligibility to stand for the presidency, according to the law that stipulates no Mubarak aides in power for at least 10 years.

Image 5 of 914th June: the Supreme Constitutional Court re-visits Shafiq's eligibility to stand for the presidency, according to the law that stipulates no Mubarak aides in power for at least 10 years.

6

June 14th's parliamentary meltdown: The same day of the ruling that keeps Shafiq in the race, a third of the Islamist parliament is dissolved by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). Once capture in a slumber session, the parliament has now affectively nodded off as a third of it - the upper assembly- has been dissolved.

Image 6 of 9June 14th's parliamentary meltdown: The same day of the ruling that keeps Shafiq in the race, a third of the Islamist parliament is dissolved by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). Once capture in a slumber session, the parliament has now affectively nodded off as a third of it - the upper assembly- has been dissolved.

7

It's a double whammy for the people who battled to keep the military at bay: with parliament dissolved, the Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) rule Shafiq eligible to stand. A fleeting moment of triumph for Shafiq, now defeated.

Image 7 of 9It's a double whammy for the people who battled to keep the military at bay: with parliament dissolved, the Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) rule Shafiq eligible to stand. A fleeting moment of triumph for Shafiq, now defeated.

8

June 18th: The Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) panic that Shafiq won't win so amend the law through Article 56, guaranteeing that they still have power over the army and can arrest civilians with impunity. Flash-back to Khaled Said. Back to the old square one or back to Tahrir full circle?

Image 8 of 9June 18th: The Supreme Council for the Armed Forces (SCAF) panic that Shafiq won't win so amend the law through Article 56, guaranteeing that they still have power over the army and can arrest civilians with impunity. Flash-back to Khaled Said. Back to the old square one or back to Tahrir full circle?

9

Khaled Said's revolutionary powerhouse Facebook campaign (We are all Khaled Said) is from today the platform that is saying NO to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF).

Image 9 of 9Khaled Said's revolutionary powerhouse Facebook campaign (We are all Khaled Said) is from today the platform that is saying NO to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF).

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Back to a military future

Some are calling today's announcement by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) of power over the president (rather than power to the people) a de facto military coup, in the tradition of Gamel Abdul Nasser in 1950s Egypt.

With parliament dissolved and martial law effective, since Friday the 14th, the army generals today went on to announce their own military interim constitution to plug the gap of a country short of a parliament and a constitution -- both prerequisites to furmishing an active President. Once again, it is in the army's, not the people's, hands to effect 'change' and a permanent constitution for Egypt's future.

The Brotherhood, having completed one electoral battle against Hosni Mubarak’s symbolic vestige is now primed to challenge the unabashed military grab maneuver pulled off by SCAF in broad daylight.

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