Too sexy for their NGOs? Al Bawaba's tips for Tinder 'humanitarians'

Published August 27th, 2015 - 14:16 GMT

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Picture this. You’re in a foreign place working in disaster relief or emergency assistance, and you crave some reconnection to your hipster existence back in (insert First World City). You turn to Tinder, the location-based app that lets you scan and choose a love interest like you used to order pizza. The winning lottery ticket in the world of online dating is a primo first impression. But how best to rev up your sex appeal when you’re dealing with 3 seconds of facetime on a tiny smartphone screen? Continue reading below »

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Real humanitarians know the job ain’t the easiest way to see the world. Pay can be paltry and living conditions spartan. As for cool side-trips? Likely you're put in a zip code where local travel is problematic, and for regional touring - revisit “pay is paltry”.  If your main mojo is travel, stick to couchsurfing.
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Image 1 of 8:  1 / 8Real humanitarians know the job ain’t the easiest way to see the world. Pay can be paltry and living conditions spartan. As for cool side-trips? Likely you're put in a zip code where local travel is problematic, and for regional touring - revisit “pay is paltry”. If your main mojo is travel, stick to couchsurfing.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians don't do things FOR people, they work WITH people to transfer knowledge and skills. Want to make real change in the world? Demonstrate absolute respect towards the people stuck in any situation that requires aid in the first place.
Reduce

Image 2 of 8:  2 / 8Real humanitarians don't do things FOR people, they work WITH people to transfer knowledge and skills. Want to make real change in the world? Demonstrate absolute respect towards the people stuck in any situation that requires aid in the first place.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians know their motives. In 'The Selfish Altruist', former Oxfam manager Tony Vaux wrote there’s no such a thing as a purely selfless act, “We give something, we receive something, whether it’s money, power, love, appreciation, gratitude.” Notice he didn't say we “take” something - like pictures without your consent.
Reduce

Image 3 of 8:  3 / 8Real humanitarians know their motives. In "The Selfish Altruist", former Oxfam manager Tony Vaux wrote there’s no such a thing as a purely selfless act, “We give something, we receive something, whether it’s money, power, love, appreciation, gratitude.” Notice he didn't say we “take” something - like pictures without your consent.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians know that doing good work doesn't necessarily make a good person. And NGOs don’t hold a monopoly on do-gooding. It’s way more complicated than that. Take it from Aretha Franklin, it's largely about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Open mindedness helps too.
Reduce

Image 4 of 8:  4 / 8Real humanitarians know that doing good work doesn't necessarily make a good person. And NGOs don’t hold a monopoly on do-gooding. It’s way more complicated than that. Take it from Aretha Franklin, it's largely about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Open mindedness helps too.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians commit to a cause, not just to a specific zip code or charity logo. The job often becomes a lifestyle, blurring lines between your work and everything else.
Reduce

Image 5 of 8:  5 / 8Real humanitarians commit to a cause, not just to a specific zip code or charity logo. The job often becomes a lifestyle, blurring lines between your work and everything else.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians are acutely aware of the differences between themselves and the people they assist. They don't exploit that divide to spin a romantic definition of themselves. It isn't 'humanitarianism' if the human benefitting most is yourself.
Reduce

Image 6 of 8:  6 / 8Real humanitarians are acutely aware of the differences between themselves and the people they assist. They don't exploit that divide to spin a romantic definition of themselves. It isn't "humanitarianism" if the human benefitting most is yourself.

Enlarge
Real humanitarians aren’t into ego massage. Sure, take satisfaction in a job well done. Be chuffed about hitting your goals. But it’s deplorable to self-promote your “humanity” and name-drop those UN Ambassadors you chauffeur to airports just to land yourself as a “knight in white satin” sheets!
Reduce

Image 7 of 8:  7 / 8Real humanitarians aren’t into ego massage. Sure, take satisfaction in a job well done. Be chuffed about hitting your goals. But it’s deplorable to self-promote your “humanity” and name-drop those UN Ambassadors you chauffeur to airports just to land yourself as a “knight in white satin” sheets!

Enlarge
Real humanitarians can experience serious strains on relationships. Separation from loved ones, unpredictable travel, and stressors stemming from living in places of dire need can tempt you to hook up with colleagues, rarely a good idea. So maybe Tinder is perfect for you - just leave the kid out of the picture.
Reduce

Image 8 of 8:  8 / 8Real humanitarians can experience serious strains on relationships. Separation from loved ones, unpredictable travel, and stressors stemming from living in places of dire need can tempt you to hook up with colleagues, rarely a good idea. So maybe Tinder is perfect for you - just leave the kid out of the picture.

Enlarge

1

Real humanitarians know the job ain’t the easiest way to see the world. Pay can be paltry and living conditions spartan. As for cool side-trips? Likely you're put in a zip code where local travel is problematic, and for regional touring - revisit “pay is paltry”.  If your main mojo is travel, stick to couchsurfing.

Image 1 of 8Real humanitarians know the job ain’t the easiest way to see the world. Pay can be paltry and living conditions spartan. As for cool side-trips? Likely you're put in a zip code where local travel is problematic, and for regional touring - revisit “pay is paltry”. If your main mojo is travel, stick to couchsurfing.

2

Real humanitarians don't do things FOR people, they work WITH people to transfer knowledge and skills. Want to make real change in the world? Demonstrate absolute respect towards the people stuck in any situation that requires aid in the first place.

Image 2 of 8Real humanitarians don't do things FOR people, they work WITH people to transfer knowledge and skills. Want to make real change in the world? Demonstrate absolute respect towards the people stuck in any situation that requires aid in the first place.

3

Real humanitarians know their motives. In 'The Selfish Altruist', former Oxfam manager Tony Vaux wrote there’s no such a thing as a purely selfless act, “We give something, we receive something, whether it’s money, power, love, appreciation, gratitude.” Notice he didn't say we “take” something - like pictures without your consent.

Image 3 of 8Real humanitarians know their motives. In "The Selfish Altruist", former Oxfam manager Tony Vaux wrote there’s no such a thing as a purely selfless act, “We give something, we receive something, whether it’s money, power, love, appreciation, gratitude.” Notice he didn't say we “take” something - like pictures without your consent.

4

Real humanitarians know that doing good work doesn't necessarily make a good person. And NGOs don’t hold a monopoly on do-gooding. It’s way more complicated than that. Take it from Aretha Franklin, it's largely about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Open mindedness helps too.

Image 4 of 8Real humanitarians know that doing good work doesn't necessarily make a good person. And NGOs don’t hold a monopoly on do-gooding. It’s way more complicated than that. Take it from Aretha Franklin, it's largely about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Open mindedness helps too.

5

Real humanitarians commit to a cause, not just to a specific zip code or charity logo. The job often becomes a lifestyle, blurring lines between your work and everything else.

Image 5 of 8Real humanitarians commit to a cause, not just to a specific zip code or charity logo. The job often becomes a lifestyle, blurring lines between your work and everything else.

6

Real humanitarians are acutely aware of the differences between themselves and the people they assist. They don't exploit that divide to spin a romantic definition of themselves. It isn't 'humanitarianism' if the human benefitting most is yourself.

Image 6 of 8Real humanitarians are acutely aware of the differences between themselves and the people they assist. They don't exploit that divide to spin a romantic definition of themselves. It isn't "humanitarianism" if the human benefitting most is yourself.

7

Real humanitarians aren’t into ego massage. Sure, take satisfaction in a job well done. Be chuffed about hitting your goals. But it’s deplorable to self-promote your “humanity” and name-drop those UN Ambassadors you chauffeur to airports just to land yourself as a “knight in white satin” sheets!

Image 7 of 8Real humanitarians aren’t into ego massage. Sure, take satisfaction in a job well done. Be chuffed about hitting your goals. But it’s deplorable to self-promote your “humanity” and name-drop those UN Ambassadors you chauffeur to airports just to land yourself as a “knight in white satin” sheets!

8

Real humanitarians can experience serious strains on relationships. Separation from loved ones, unpredictable travel, and stressors stemming from living in places of dire need can tempt you to hook up with colleagues, rarely a good idea. So maybe Tinder is perfect for you - just leave the kid out of the picture.

Image 8 of 8Real humanitarians can experience serious strains on relationships. Separation from loved ones, unpredictable travel, and stressors stemming from living in places of dire need can tempt you to hook up with colleagues, rarely a good idea. So maybe Tinder is perfect for you - just leave the kid out of the picture.

Reduce

A guy named Cody Clarke noticed a trend on Tinder. White people working in the humanitarian service sector were pulling in local people of color as profile pic props. Tourists were doing it too. He told Fast Company, “Obviously the original intent, is, 'Hey, friends, look where I was', but it becomes a disgusting thing." So when did Third World people become a dating essential like condoms or cologne?

Last year he started a blog named Humanitarians of Tinder where he posts the offending pictures sent in by his followers. Most postings are from Africa, but the ballooning refugee crisis is bringing increased Tinder traffic from NGO workers across the Middle East. To that we say haram!  

Nerve's Liam Mathews smartly summed it up,"It's noble and admirable to try to help struggling people, but is the goal to help, or is it to get a cute photo opportunity that will one day get you laid?" So perhaps a reminder of humanitarian basics is in order - tips on best behavior for would-be aid workers, paired with some of the most egregious images - including some from the Middle East. 

 

 

 










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