Did an Iraqi airstrike just kill a militant the FBI's been hunting for almost a decade?

Published June 1st, 2015 - 01:36 GMT
A Daesh militant killed in Iraq over the weekend has some wondering whether it might be the same Syrian-American terrorist the FBI's been hunting for almost a decade. (YouTube)
A Daesh militant killed in Iraq over the weekend has some wondering whether it might be the same Syrian-American terrorist the FBI's been hunting for almost a decade. (YouTube)

This weekend the Iraqi army said it launched an air attack near Fallujah that killed 28 Daesh militants, one of which was a man named Abu Muhammad al-Suri.

This name rang Arabic media bells as the force behind many of Daesh’s propaganda and execution videos. But the Iraqi security services’ report said the militant also went by another name — Abu Samra. And it has some people asking a new question —  is this the same terrorist that the FBI has been hunting for almost a decade?

Ahmad Abu Samra, a Syrian-American 25-year-old telecommunications worker in 2006, was brought in for FBI questioning in Boston after a trip to Syria, but wasn’t charged with anything. His name appeared again in 2012, this time with a $50,000 bounty on the FBI’s Most Wanted Terrorist List, for trying to obtain military training in Yemen and Pakistan to carry out attacks against US soldiers. Back then, he was believed to be part of Daesh’s mother group, Al Qaeda in Iraq.

Then he showed up in Syria last year, headlining in international media as the University of Boston graduate running Daesh’s social media campaigns. Abu Samra’s Syrian origins would also match the “al-Suri” (meaning “the Syrian”).

No official has confirmed whether this was the same militant killed yesterday.

 


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