Will Abdul Sayed Become the First Muslim Governor of Michigan?

Published August 6th, 2018 - 01:52 GMT
Abdul Sayed, the first Egyptian-American Muslim to run as governor for Michigan in 2018 with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (@AbdulElSayed/Twitter)
Abdul Sayed, the first Egyptian-American Muslim to run as governor for Michigan in 2018 with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (@AbdulElSayed/Twitter)

By Randa Darwish

Abdul Sayed is about to become the first Egyptian-American Muslim governor of Michigan, if he passes the 2018 Democratic Party primary elections on Aug 7, 2018. This will enable him to run for the Michigan gubernatorial election of 2018 in November.

The Democratic Party has been seen shifting its base recently towards more traditional liberals, Abdul was endorsed by several notable Democratic figures, including US Senator Bernie Sanders,

And the congressional nominee Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

In a statement released by Sanders on supporting Abdul, he said: “Under Abdul’s leadership Michigan can help lead the nation in guaranteeing health care for all through a Medicare for All single-payer type system, tuition free public colleges and universities, a minimum wage of $15 per hour and strong environmental protections.”

As some might refer to him as the “new Obama”, Abdul has reminded people of Obama and that is believed to refer to his young age, the multi-ethnic background he came from and his political ambitions.

Born in Detroit for Egyptian migrant parents, Abdul has also attracted the attention of Americans as being the first Muslim candidate to run in Michigan in addition to his plans toward supporting “Medicare-for-all,” making college tuition-free, and raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

“I went to medical school to learn how to heal, then I realized it was our politics that made people sick.”

Abdul believes his diverse background is what he represents, as he was born in the US for two Muslim Egyptian parents, and this is what the American society is about, diversity.

However, he found many critics who opposed him for his use of religion and origins to get votes.

On social media, Abdul and his supporters launched the hashtag: “DoneWaiting” to express how they are fed up with waiting “for a government for the people, and by the people.”

On the other hand, Abdul found many critics and opponents as well. Most of them are right-wing Republicans who criticized him for his religion, ethnicity and for other reasons.


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