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People, some wearing face masks, wave a giant Turkey national flag and shout slogans outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage si

People, some wearing face masks, wave a giant Turkey national flag and shout slogans outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The

People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

A man flashes the V for Victory hand sign and waves a flag outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to

A man flashes the V for Victory hand sign and waves a flag outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The

People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tour

Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

A tourist visits the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for to

A tourist visits the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tour

Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

Two men take a selfie picture in front of Hagia Sophia on July 11, 2020 in Istanbul, a day after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The World Council of Churches, which represents 350 Christian churches, said on July 11 it wrote to Turkey's President expressing "grief and dismay" over his decision to turn the Hagia Sophia back into a mosque. Ozan KOSE / AFP

Two men take a selfie picture in front of Hagia Sophia on July 11, 2020 in Istanbul, a day after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The World Council of Churches, which represents 350 Christian churches, said on July 11 it wrote to Turkey's President expressing "grief and dismay" over his decision to turn the Hagia Sophia back into a mosque. Ozan KOSE / AFP

Women pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum on July 10, 2020 in Istanbul as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul b

Women pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum on July 10, 2020 in Istanbul as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tourists -- has been a museum since 1935, open to believers of all faiths thanks to a cabinet decision stamped by modern Turkey's founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Ozan KOSE / AFP

People, some wearing face masks, wave a giant Turkey national flag and shout slogans outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage si
People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The
A man flashes the V for Victory hand sign and waves a flag outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to
People, some wearing face masks, pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum in Istanbul on July 10, 2020 as they gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The
Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tour
A tourist visits the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for to
Tourists visit the inside of Hagia Sophia on July 10, 2020, in Istanbul, before a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul building -- a magnet for tour
Two men take a selfie picture in front of Hagia Sophia on July 11, 2020 in Istanbul, a day after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The World Council of Churches, which represents 350 Christian churches, said on July 11 it wrote to Turkey's President expressing "grief and dismay" over his decision to turn the Hagia Sophia back into a mosque. Ozan KOSE / AFP
Women pray outside the Hagia Sophia museum on July 10, 2020 in Istanbul as people gather to celebrate after a top Turkish court revoked the sixth-century Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, clearing the way for it to be turned back into a mosque. The Council of State, the country's highest administrative court which on July 2 debated a case brought by a Turkish NGO, cancelled a 1934 cabinet decision and ruled the UNESCO World Heritage site would be reopened to Muslim worshipping. The sixth-century Istanbul b
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP

Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP

A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP
A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.

Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh, but was also trusted by rival parties and armed groups, which used him as a mediator. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP

An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.
Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP
A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus.  (pixabay)

The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. (pixabay)

A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus.  (pixabay)

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