Guards stand next to the flags of the participating countries at the entrance of the German Chancellery in Berlin on January 19, 2020, before the arrival of the participants of the Peace summit on Libya. John MACDOUGALL / AFP
Turkey expects a positive outcome from the Libya peace conference in Berlin, Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said on Sunday. Speaking to reporters in Berlin ahead of the conference, Cavusoglu said participating states have reached a

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Jordanians protest the country’s gas imports from Israel, as part of a public backlash against normalising relations between the two countries. Twitter

Jordanians protest the country’s gas imports from Israel, as part of a public backlash against normalising relations between the two countries. Twitter

Jordanian security forces prevented the protesters from reaching the symbolic Al-Nakheel Square in Amman. (Twitter)

Jordanian security forces prevented the protesters from reaching the symbolic Al-Nakheel Square in Amman. (Twitter)

The Jordanian flag-waving protesters also threatened to overthrow the government if it sticks by the gas deal. Twitter

The Jordanian flag-waving protesters also threatened to overthrow the government if it sticks to the gas deal. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

A parliamentary session planned, Sunday, to submit an urgent memo requesting a ban on gas purchases from Israel. Twitter

A parliamentary session planned, Sunday, to submit an urgent memo requesting a ban on gas purchases from Israel. Twitter

The $10 billion deal is expected to provide 45 billion cubic meters of Israeli gas to Jordan over the next 15 years. Twitter

The $10 billion deal is expected to provide 45 billion cubic meters of Israeli gas to Jordan over the next 15 years. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter

Hundreds of Jordanians demonstrated in downtown Amman on Friday, calling on the government to cancel an agreement with Israel. Twitter

Hundreds of Jordanians demonstrated in downtown Amman on Friday, calling on the government to cancel an agreement with Israel. Twitter

Jordanians protest the country’s gas imports from Israel, as part of a public backlash against normalising relations between the two countries. Twitter
Jordanian security forces prevented the protesters from reaching the symbolic Al-Nakheel Square in Amman. (Twitter)
The Jordanian flag-waving protesters also threatened to overthrow the government if it sticks by the gas deal. Twitter
Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter
A parliamentary session planned, Sunday, to submit an urgent memo requesting a ban on gas purchases from Israel. Twitter
The $10 billion deal is expected to provide 45 billion cubic meters of Israeli gas to Jordan over the next 15 years. Twitter
Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter
Mass demonstration kicks off in downtown Amman against the country's gas deal with Israel. Twitter
Hundreds of Jordanians demonstrated in downtown Amman on Friday, calling on the government to cancel an agreement with Israel. Twitter
A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a boy steering a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a boy steering a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows people steering boats on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YA

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows people steering boats on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a girl steering a boat on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. Y

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a girl steering a boat on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling daily items on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess.

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling daily items on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a teacher speaking to his students during his class at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although t

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a teacher speaking to his students during his class at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a student next to a board at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a student next to a board at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a woman smoking fish in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA /

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a woman smoking fish in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling breakfast from a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess.

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling breakfast from a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows women on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows women on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a boy steering a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA
A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows people steering boats on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YA
A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a girl steering a boat on a waterway in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. Y
A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling daily items on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess.
A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a teacher speaking to his students during his class at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although t
A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a student next to a board at a private school in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's
A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows a woman smoking fish in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA /
A picture taken on March 2, 2019 shows a woman selling breakfast from a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess.
A picture taken on March 1, 2019 shows women on a boat in the Makoko waterfront community in a polluted lagoon in Lagos, Africa’s biggest megalopolis in Nigeria. The sprawling community began in the 19th century as a fishing village for immigrants who settled on the water's edge. As more arrived and land became rare, people started to move out onto the water. Over time, Makoko became a floating realm of perhaps a quarter of a million people, although the real number is anyone's guess. YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul.

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul.

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP

In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul.
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors take a selfie as they look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
In a photo taken on January 11, 2020 visitors look at an annual light display at the 'Garden on Morning Calm', near Gapyeong, east of Seoul. Ed JONES / AFP
A Hindu devotee performs a ritual before taking a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kms south of Kolkata on January 13, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee performs a ritual before taking a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kms south of Kolkata on January 13, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) waits to offer blessings to devotees at a temporary camp during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) waits to offer blessings to devotees at a temporary camp during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee walks towards the festival area during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee walks towards the festival area during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Sadhu (Hindu holy man) blesses a pilgrim during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Sadhu (Hindu holy man) blesses a pilgrim during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

Hindu devotees gather to take a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

Hindu devotees gather to take a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A young Hindu devotee walks past a stall selling religious images during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A young Hindu devotee walks past a stall selling religious images during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP

A Hindu devotee performs a ritual before taking a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kms south of Kolkata on January 13, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A Hindu Sadhu (holy man) waits to offer blessings to devotees at a temporary camp during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, around 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP
A Hindu devotee walks towards the festival area during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A Sadhu (Hindu holy man) blesses a pilgrim during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
Hindu devotees gather to take a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A young Hindu devotee walks past a stall selling religious images during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. XAVIER GALIANA / AFP
A Hindu devotee takes a holy dip in the Bay of Bengal during the Gangasagar Mela, at Sagar Island, some 150 kilometres south of Kolkata on January 14, 2020. Xavier GALIANA / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Costumed revellers sporting in their costumes a Freemason's square and compass flag and an assault rifle take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1,400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Costumed revellers sporting in their costumes a Freemason's square and compass flag and an assault rifle take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1,400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers - one wearing a yellow vest waving a French national flag - another with a placard which reads as " enough is enough" take part with others in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Rober

Masked revellers - one wearing a yellow vest waving a French national flag - another with a placard which reads as " enough is enough" take part with others in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP

Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Costumed revellers sporting in their costumes a Freemason's square and compass flag and an assault rifle take part in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1,400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Robert ATANASOVSKI / AFP
Masked revellers - one wearing a yellow vest waving a French national flag - another with a placard which reads as " enough is enough" take part with others in a carnival procession through the south-western North Macedonian village of Vevcani, on January 13, 2020. The Vevcani carnival is 1.400 years old and is held every year on the eve of the feast of Saint Basil (January 14), which also marks the beginning of the New Year according to the Julian calendar, observed by the Macedonian Orthodox Church. Rober

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