All 'Eyes' on Tahrir: The Second Egyptian Revolution Goes Back to Square One?

Published November 24th, 2011 - 11:18 GMT

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For Egypt's brave people who forced Mubarak's hand the first time round in their endurance & staying (in the square) power, 
the price of their elusive & transitory freedom has come at a high human cost. The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), 
are taking snipes at Egyptian eyes in a vicious blow to the civilian victors of the revolution.
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Image 1 of 15: For Egypt's brave people who forced Mubarak's hand the first time round in their endurance & staying (in the square) power, the price of their elusive & transitory freedom has come at a high human cost. The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), are taking snipes at Egyptian eyes in a vicious blow to the civilian victors of the revolution.

As people flooded the iconic square that inspired other Arab squares since to aspire to feats as freedom, the media lens
shifted back to this deja-vu scene of people power. But those in power now, SCAF were plainly abusing their authority,
issuing orders to target heads. Personnel could be heard receiving orders to aim for protesters' 
eyes.
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Image 1 of 15: As people flooded the iconic square that inspired other Arab squares since to aspire to feats as freedom, the media lens shifted back to this deja-vu scene of people power. But those in power now, SCAF were plainly abusing their authority, issuing orders to target heads. Personnel could be heard receiving orders to aim for protesters' eyes.

Necessity is the mother of all invention: Sniper 'sight' shield-  a mask designed by Egyptians to protect eyes from sniper bullets.  
One remarkably striking case was that of an, Ahmad Harara, who lost his sight in the first eye in the first round of 
violent protest clashes, January 28th, only to lose the remaining eye during the current spree.
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Image 1 of 15: Necessity is the mother of all invention: Sniper 'sight' shield- a mask designed by Egyptians to protect eyes from sniper bullets. One remarkably striking case was that of an, Ahmad Harara, who lost his sight in the first eye in the first round of violent protest clashes, January 28th, only to lose the remaining eye during the current spree.

Sweeney, Porter and Gates: 3 American college kids caught in the thick of the new Tahrir crisis, 
meddling in Egyptian affairs, provoking security forces with petrol bombs. Broadcast on Egyptian state television, these Cairo 
University students' involvement fans flames on the whole foreign interference debate that plagues Arab revolutions.
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Image 1 of 15: Sweeney, Porter and Gates: 3 American college kids caught in the thick of the new Tahrir crisis, meddling in Egyptian affairs, provoking security forces with petrol bombs. Broadcast on Egyptian state television, these Cairo University students' involvement fans flames on the whole foreign interference debate that plagues Arab revolutions.

Coming up for freedom & air: The protesting people are met with harmful gases. Egyptian police under SCAF 
command have been using excessive force against anti-government crowds. 'Teargas' is being used in no short supply in 
Tahrir:  Potent gases, suspected to be nerve gas or cyanide gas, are causing hundreds of protesters to faint or worse.
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Image 1 of 15: Coming up for freedom & air: The protesting people are met with harmful gases. Egyptian police under SCAF command have been using excessive force against anti-government crowds. 'Teargas' is being used in no short supply in Tahrir: Potent gases, suspected to be nerve gas or cyanide gas, are causing hundreds of protesters to faint or worse.

A disillusionment with Tahrir Part 1: Military command no better than Mubarak? Protestors weild signs
'Mubarak, leave!' to make the point that little has changed since the 1st round of revolution. Not to agrees with 
Donald Trump's: 'We should never have abandoned Mubarak.'  A rejoinder retorted: 'We didn't abandon Mubarak, the Egyptians
did.'
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Image 1 of 15: A disillusionment with Tahrir Part 1: Military command no better than Mubarak? Protestors weild signs 'Mubarak, leave!' to make the point that little has changed since the 1st round of revolution. Not to agrees with Donald Trump's: 'We should never have abandoned Mubarak.' A rejoinder retorted: 'We didn't abandon Mubarak, the Egyptians did.'

People V Army: No love lost between the people & the military. Soldiers in the initial revolution sided with the people against the
'regime'. Disillusioned folk are back at Tahrir demanding an end to military rule, that through its 'military' trials has 
shown a harshness that is an unwelcome substitute to Mubarak.
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Image 1 of 15: People V Army: No love lost between the people & the military. Soldiers in the initial revolution sided with the people against the 'regime'. Disillusioned folk are back at Tahrir demanding an end to military rule, that through its 'military' trials has shown a harshness that is an unwelcome substitute to Mubarak.

SCAF, born of the old regime, has a fraught relation with the throngs in freedom square
waving banners. SCAF held crisis talks with political & religious forces to defuse the crisis with 
a ceasefire. Funerals of the dead are not a good sign for free Egypt, and news of more killings after Day 6, 
Revolution Round 2, did not encourage compliance.
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Image 1 of 15: SCAF, born of the old regime, has a fraught relation with the throngs in freedom square waving banners. SCAF held crisis talks with political & religious forces to defuse the crisis with a ceasefire. Funerals of the dead are not a good sign for free Egypt, and news of more killings after Day 6, Revolution Round 2, did not encourage compliance.

The Muslim Brotherhood, hailed as Egypt's best-organised political force, had said it would take part in the Tahrir truce talks
but there were reports of a pull-out from 'crisis' Square. As Tahrir turns into a spectacle of mixed agendas & violent chaos, 
including asphyxiation, it is no surprise that some Egyptian influences would rather opt out.
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Image 1 of 15: The Muslim Brotherhood, hailed as Egypt's best-organised political force, had said it would take part in the Tahrir truce talks but there were reports of a pull-out from 'crisis' Square. As Tahrir turns into a spectacle of mixed agendas & violent chaos, including asphyxiation, it is no surprise that some Egyptian influences would rather opt out.

Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, who heads Egypt's ruling military council, addressed the nation
 as clashes between police and protesters demanding democratic change reached fever pitch in a resounding 'No' to the military. 
In short, the people have rejected a promise by SCAF's ruler to speed up a presidential election to the first half of 2012.
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Image 1 of 15: Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, who heads Egypt's ruling military council, addressed the nation as clashes between police and protesters demanding democratic change reached fever pitch in a resounding 'No' to the military. In short, the people have rejected a promise by SCAF's ruler to speed up a presidential election to the first half of 2012.

Occupy Palestine=Occupy Cairo; SCAF=IDF: The brutal handling of people by the police on square duty corresponds to Israel's
Defence Forces rough-handling of Palestinians. The US urges all to end deplorable violence & the Egyptian government to exercise maximum restraint to protect the rights of all Egyptians to peacefully express themselves.
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Image 1 of 15: Occupy Palestine=Occupy Cairo; SCAF=IDF: The brutal handling of people by the police on square duty corresponds to Israel's Defence Forces rough-handling of Palestinians. The US urges all to end deplorable violence & the Egyptian government to exercise maximum restraint to protect the rights of all Egyptians to peacefully express themselves.

The return of Egypt is a distraction from other Arab trials in Syria and Yemen, even Kuwait: Throngs of protesting Egyptians take the
heat off Bashar al-Assad's unraveling regime under which 4 boys were killed during the Tahrir drama. Aged 10, 11, 13 
and 15 - the boys were 'indiscriminately' gunned down by forces manning a Syrian checkpoint.
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Image 1 of 15: The return of Egypt is a distraction from other Arab trials in Syria and Yemen, even Kuwait: Throngs of protesting Egyptians take the heat off Bashar al-Assad's unraveling regime under which 4 boys were killed during the Tahrir drama. Aged 10, 11, 13 and 15 - the boys were "indiscriminately" gunned down by forces manning a Syrian checkpoint.

Speaking of 'Assad' (Arabic for 'lion'): An Egyptian lion has its eye bandaged to represent the striking wound pattern of the second 
Egyptian revolution. The symbolism is endless. Trying to block a people's outcry and obscure their vision for 
change. Obstructing the world media lens. An attempt to disable their efforts to be seen and heard.
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Image 1 of 15: Speaking of 'Assad' (Arabic for 'lion'): An Egyptian lion has its eye bandaged to represent the striking wound pattern of the second Egyptian revolution. The symbolism is endless. Trying to block a people's outcry and obscure their vision for change. Obstructing the world media lens. An attempt to disable their efforts to be seen and heard.

These people expect to die or suffer grave wounds. A protestor writes his mother's phone number on his arm before 
heading out to 'martyr' square, knowing full well that already 38 comrades have lost their lives in the resurgence of police brutality. 
Revolution II for Egypt has taken on a more violent tone from the outset.
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Image 1 of 15: These people expect to die or suffer grave wounds. A protestor writes his mother's phone number on his arm before heading out to 'martyr' square, knowing full well that already 38 comrades have lost their lives in the resurgence of police brutality. Revolution II for Egypt has taken on a more violent tone from the outset.

Cairo captures imagination: Amidst the political palaver, this scandalous nude blogger story (instead of the no-show 
elections) created a media frenzy. Debates touched on liberty & patriarchy in the conservative Arab culture. More 'rude' than
her nakedness was Aliaa's candid confession of her lifestyle, replete with boyfriend & per-marital sex.
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Image 1 of 15: Cairo captures imagination: Amidst the political palaver, this scandalous nude blogger story (instead of the no-show elections) created a media frenzy. Debates touched on liberty & patriarchy in the conservative Arab culture. More 'rude' than her nakedness was Aliaa's candid confession of her lifestyle, replete with boyfriend & per-marital sex.

Cairo in Crisis:

It's being tagged the second Egyptian Revolution of 2011. What happened to the much fan-fared November Egyptian elections?

The elections are hanging in the balance, once again in limbo, until further notice.

Frustration about the army's commitment to the handover to civilian rule has built up in the last few months and fury has once again spilled over into streams of people flooding Tahrir Square to voice their grievances.

The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) which took over from Mubarak on Feb. 11, wants to hand over day-to-day governance, but not til next year, and to retain general powers that could undermine civilian authority in the future.

The head of SCAF, Field Marshal Tantawi (being unflatteringly labeled the new Mubarak) says that the November 28 parliamentary elections will go ahead and that presidential elections will happen in July 2012. The idea of a referendum for that same scheduled day has been tossed about in addition. The cabinet headed by PM Essam Sharaf has had its resignation accepted by the SCAF forces that be.

The Tahrir crowd has not been appeased in reactions reminiscent of the mood in response to Mubarak's speeches earlier in the year.

The military council has defended itself against charges of excessive force on the protesting people and allegations of using noxious gases against the civilian population.

What the people want:

 They want Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi to step down immediately in favor of an interim civilian council. 

True, the dictator has gone, but the system that he built and the political allies who he left behind in his wake have not gone anywhere, guaging by the people's experience since Mubarak swapped the seat of power for a hospital bed and a jury box.

Why has this protest become so 'deplorably' violent as the US puts it?

The military the old regime nurtured are still in power .There's been very little change in the personnel and the makeup of the police since the January revolution.

One could view this revolution as a resumption of the original January 25th effort for freedom and a new order that got waylaid by sectarian strife in the interim since the Mubarak successful ouster. This time round the tone is even more defiant as activists do not want the revolution still at hand since Janaruy,  to lose sight of goals or get distracted by other agendas.

Like Ali Abdullah Saleh, saying next year or 2013 is not soon enough for a people who have waited years for change. He has since  finally signed a leaving-soon pledge that will transfer power to his deputy within 30 days.

Egyptians want proof of their long fought revolution to appear today not tomorrow. Not 2012 or 2013, as Saleh formerly promised his own tribes of people.

Arabian protest temperatures soar and heat up despite the onset of winter. Back to Tahrir for the Egyptian Revolution Take 2.

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