Lawlessness grips the Nile: mob crime plunges Egypt back to a darker age

Published June 11th, 2013 - 15:06 GMT

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Gas station queues clog up Egypt
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Image 1 of 7: Scrambles for fuel at Egypt's gas station as cars are stuck waiting to fill their tanks. After struggling to obtain bank payments for fuel sales, suppliers began to think twice before offering oil to Egypt. Demands for diesel became commonplace, and long lines and car congestion at gas stations weren’t an unusual site

Tourism is drying up in Egypt
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Image 1 of 7: Tourism is drying up in once hot-spots of Egypt. More than two years after the revolution, Egypt’s once thriving tourism sector is now faltering. The World Economic Forum has declared the country as one of the most dangerous tourist destinations in the world. Crime rates have escalated due to high cost of living, reports say.

Egypt beset in waves of violent crime
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Image 1 of 7: Security problems continue to plague Egypt since former president Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in 2011. There have been a growing number of reports regarding crime - such as lynchings, beatings, rapes and stabbings. Some of the populace nation's masses are taking ‘justice’ into their hands and nobody is stymieing this tide of mob mayhem.

Egyptians are still hungry and frightened
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Image 1 of 7: People have fled Egypt in drones since former president Mubarak was overthrown. Some have left the country in fear that their religions will leave them vulnerable to attack while others have bailed due to the lack of security or economic stability.

kidnappings in Egypt
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Image 1 of 7: There have been 150 kidnappings documented in Egypt since 2011. The majority of them are blamed on criminal gangs, which operate more freely since Mubarak’s downfall. Of the reported kidnappings, 37 have fallen within the last two months, the Interior Ministry said.

Egyptian economy in dire straits
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Image 1 of 7: Dire straits: Mubarak's uprising hit Egypt in the pocket as tourists and investors – two of the country’s main sources of foreign exchange – left it stuck in negotiations for billions of dollars with the International Monetary Fund. Egypt’s reserves only rose by $1 billion despite a $2 billion deposit from Libya in April of this year.

Egyptians string up a suspected thief
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Image 1 of 7: Egypt has seen a spate of mob murders. Here, a thief is hanged by vigilantes. Political deadlock, a stagnant economy, and now a security breakdown has caused Egyptians to take the law into their own hands, leaving solutions hanging in the balance beyond the reach of the flailing president.

Some may have predicted that former president Hosni Mubarak's downfall would lead to greater riches for Egypt. A time of relative darkness under dictatorship by rights would give way to illumination and progress. At the time, people were living in poor conditions and many questioned why life was so harsh when the country generated so much revenue.

But ever since Mubarak was usurped in 2011, Egypt has seen an increase in violence - from vigilantes hanging thieves, to sprees of kidnappings, murder and also rape.

Yet the mayhem under Mohammad Morsi's rule doesn’t end there.

Companies have become less willing to sell gas to the country, causing long lines and petroleum shortages. Further, the World Economic Forum has declared the country as one of the world’s most dangerous tourist destinations - a huge blow to a country that heavily relies on that sector.

Also, its stash of foreign reserves is a reflection of a state teetering on financial collapse.

Recently, a criminal court in Cairo ordered the release of Mubarak’s sons, Alaa and Gamal Mubarak, from prison.

Meanwhile, organizers of a campaign aiming to “withdraw confidence” from current Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi announced in a press conference on Sunday that they had gathered 13 million signatures since petitions were first collected on May 1.

The “Tamarod” (rebellion) campaign has attracted global media attention for planning mass protests on June 30; the date marking Morsi’s first anniversary in power, so more civil unrest may be just around the corner.

Plebs on a power bender are putting the fear of God into Muslim Brotherhood-led Egypt as a spike in vigilante violence and mob madness leaves the country in a state of terror and turmoil. Here's a look at how the Arab world's leading light has been snuffed out and in turn plunged into insecurity and gloom.

 

 

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