Mubarak's Anniversary of Ousting Feb 11 Fails to Steal Thunder from Assads

Published February 12th, 2012 - 08:10 GMT

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Hosni Mubarak threatens to kill himself
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Image 1 of 11: The year-long ousted Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak has just this week threatened to commit suicide if he is transferred to a prison hospital in the capital, Cairo. Since his ouster, he was removed from his Sharm El Sheikh villa and detained in a military hospital in between intermittent sessions of his trial for crimes against his people.

Hosni Mubarak's grey beard photoshopped
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Image 1 of 11: Nature takes its course: They say he used to dye his hair jet black. The ailing defendant is showing a more typical silver-grey for his 83 years. (photoshopped in his PJ's, the garments public are familiar with by now, as his famous image on a stretcher wheeled into court )Mubarak has reportedly grown a beard and long-stopped coloring his hair.

Jamal Mubarak drinks poison to kill himself
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Image 1 of 11: Jamal Mubarak, the long-presumed successor to father's presidency, attempted suicide: He put poison in his tea following his father's downfall. Alaa Mubarak, the elder but less-political brother, is more popular than Jamal. Rumors that Alaa found religion ahead of his father's demise may grant him more forgiveness by a God-loving population.

Suzanne Mubarak became suicidal when first arrested.
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Image 1 of 11: Susanne Mubarak (born Thabet) the former First Lady was also inclined to take her own life when she was first taken to prison, taking sleeping pills in her suicidal desperation. Suzanne had much cause for shame. She was said to have transferred more than 250 gold ingots and 3 billion USD to Paris with the complicity of the French authorities.

Mubarak supporters wave banners of the strongman.
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Image 1 of 11: Some say as many as 40% still supported Mubarak. For loyalists, his downfall was a big blow. A year on, the "children of Mubarak" or "real Egyptians!" miss Mubarak & regard 'changed' Egypt in horror. They are alarmed for Egypt's regional stability, tourism, economy & even a Muslim parliament. They found their own Tahrir in Mustafa Mahmud square.

Egypt's presidential palace
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Image 1 of 11: Presidential Palace aides have revealed Mubarak secrets: The domestic & admin. staff of the presidential palace have shared secrets of the life of Mubarak & family, both political & personal details of how the President dealt with his Ministers & staff. Suzanne apparently 'wept prostrate on presidential palace floor' when news of the end came.

Osama Sheshtawy was not Mubarak's lawyer.
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Image 1 of 11: Mubarak's legal representation is Farid al-Deeb. This defense lawyer adopts the line that 'Mubarak supported the revolution.' Lawyer Osama Al-Sheshtawy was supposed to defend Mubarak but protesters refused. Another defense line is that Mubarak be treated like Bush who was not tried by his country for killing US soldiers in the invasion of Iraq.

Suzanne Mubarak's memoirs are due out soon.
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Image 1 of 11: Suzanne Mubarak, will be releasing her memoirs. The book written by Abdel Latif el-Menawy, includes intimate moments such as her delaying her husband's resignation. Like a Lady Macbeth figure, the woman behind the dictator, broke down at the presidential palace, found by the guards prostrate on the floor, muttering words 'They had a reason...'

Ten Kuwaiti lawyers are on Mubarak's side.
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Image 1 of 11: Ten Kuwaiti lawyers joined Mubarak's defense team for the third round of his protracted trial for corruption and killing protesters. legal support seemed to pay homage to a historical alliance between Kuwait and the Mubarak family stemming from Egypt's support of Kuwait after it was invaded by Iraq in 1990.

Mubarak acknowledges he is no longer the President.
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Image 1 of 11: Just recently Mubarak was reported to have addressed the notion of a new future president of Egypt. He gave thanks to his successor, a "Mr. President", displaying an awareness rather than a detachment from reality, associated with fallen Arab leaders these days.

The Assads not Mubaraks are hot subject.
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Image 1 of 11: Move out one dictator family for another: All eyes are on Asma Assad and her still very-much-dictating husband: No one is as concerned with the Mubaraks' shenanigans. In lieu of catching up with the Mubarak family a year on from their demise, we are more intrigued by the Assad family, as the regime rains down its deadly assault on its people.

Egypt marked the first anniversary of the ouster of Hosni Mubarak yesterday, February 12th, 2012, with a poor turnout for a strike called by activists to protest the snail pace of change from military rule to a veritable people power. This half-hearted protest exposed the country's ambivalence towards the progress made since that fateful day February 11th a year ago. Or perhaps the people of Egypt were suffering protest fatigue.

The general 'strike', another form of protest, called people to demand the immediate departure of the military council SCAF that replaced Mubarak, but failed to cause major crowds or disruption to business. It was not backed by religious figures and political groups, nor the the Islamists who now dominate parliament. It certainly did not cause enough of a hullabuloo to drag our eyes away from Syria's still-leading family, who stubbornly refuse to bow to a people in fierce opposition.

As we take a look at Egypt's long-leading family, the Mubaraks, since the dramatic ouster, a year ago, we can barely conceal the apathy and disinterest felt toward this dictator clan as the world speculates over another dictator family still bent on beating down the people, Syria's Assads.
Even news that both husband, wife and son have threatened to kill themselves was not enough to inspire interest yesterday in the Mubarak's news. The invitation to strike and protest on the 11th was mostly ignored by people who were perhaps feeling a little protested out, lost in the lines of when the first protested started and when the last one ended.

Egypt's anniversary for their booted out Mubarak was really monopolised by the Assad slaughter on Homs that attracted alarmed concern this weekend. The rising interest in Assad's family leaves no one asking questions on the status of the Mubaraks.

Mubarak is currently being held at a military hospital on the outskirts of Cairo. The ousted dictator asked his lawyer to lodge a 'complaint' against the decision to transfer him to a prison hospital. This move may be taken to appease an Egyptian protest long-brewing for why SCAF has spared Mubarak the humiliation of prison time.

The 83-year-old former dictator who was forced to step down on February 11, 2011 after 18 days of popular revolution, ending 30 years of rule and transferring temporary power to a military lead, now faces a continued trial in 'farcical' installments, for authorizing the use of force that resulted in the deaths of over 800 pro-democracy protesters during the revolution. 

Mubarak has been the first Arab ruler to stand trial in person since the wave of popular uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa kicked off in 2011 (or end of 2010 to be technical).

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