WCM-Q Researcher Offers Advice for Pregnant Women Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery

Press release
Published November 11th, 2019 - 11:53 GMT
WCM-Q Researcher Offers Advice for Pregnant Women Who Have Undergone Bariatric Surgery
Dr. Shahrad Taheri, professor of medicine and director of clinical research at WCM-Q
Highlights
Faculty at Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar (WCM-Q) have contributed to new guidelines to advise on the care of pregnant women who have had bariatric surgery.

Faculty at Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar (WCM-Q) have contributed to new guidelines to advise on the care of pregnant women who have had bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery is used to treat obesity with the majority of operations carried out to reduce the capacity of the stomach which in turn reduces food intake and results in substantial weight loss. The procedure is increasingly carried out in women who are of childbearing age.

Twenty experts from across the world have now conducted a systematic review of the available research papers to offer guidance on a range of issues which may affect bariatric surgery patients who are pregnant or trying to conceive, including contraception, diet, nutrient levels, gestational weight gain, and breast feeding.

Dr. Shahrad Taheri, professor of medicine and director of clinical research at WCM-Q, was one of experts to contribute to the paper, entitled ‘Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: Consensus recommendations for periconception, antenatal and postnatal care.’

Dr. Taheri said: “Bariatric procedures are increasingly available and cause physiological changes in the body that change processes like energy balance and fat metabolism. Pregnancy is a major physiological and nutritional challenge so the health of pregnant women who have undergone bariatric surgery. There needs to be careful monitoring to ensure that women receive sufficient nutrients to allow them and the fetus to grow and remain healthy.”

Global obesity almost tripled between 1975 and 2016, with 650 million people now classified as being clinically obese. For women, obesity increases the possibility of complications during pregnancy, and poor maternal nutrition can have a long-lasting impact on the infant, so it is recommended that women try to lose weight before conceiving. In addition, the report states that men should also lose weight if they and their partner are trying to have children.

Other guidance includes the advice that women who have undergone bariatric surgery should postpone pregnancy until their weight has stabilized and that quickly absorbed carbohydrates should be avoided; meals should instead comprise protein and low-glycemic index alternatives.

As with standard pregnancies, expectant mothers should take a variety of supplements, and their levels of micronutrients monitored before they conceive and then during each trimester. But the systematic review found that breast milk is not compromised after bariatric surgery and that breastfeeding should be encouraged.

 

Dr. Taheri said: “Pregnancy can be a confusing time for all first-time mothers with a lot of information to absorb about optimal nutrition, supplements and exercise alongside the fact that the body is physically changing and has different requirements. This confusion can be compounded for pregnant women who have undergone weight-loss surgery, and by contributing to this first international guideline, I and my colleagues hope that we can simplify the messages being delivered and offer some reassurance to expectant mothers.”

Background Information

Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar

Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar is a partnership between Cornell University and Qatar Foundation. It offers a comprehensive six-year medical program leading to the Cornell University M.D. degree with teaching by Cornell and Weill Cornell faculty and by physicians at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Aspetar Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, the Primary Health Care Corporation, the Feto Maternal Center, and Sidra Medicine, who hold Weill Cornell appointments. Through its biomedical research program, WCM-Q is building a sustainable research community in Qatar while advancing basic science and clinical research. Through its medical college, WCM-Q seeks to provide the finest education possible for medical students, to improve health care both now and for future generations, and to provide high quality health care to the Qatari population.

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