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1. Car seat

1. Car seat: A child car seat is an essential item since it guarantees the safety of your baby or toddler. Therefore, it must be installed properly and it shouldn’t be used past its expiration date. The expiration date is printed on the bottom of the seat, and the longevity of a car seat varies depending on the date of manufacture and the brand. For example: Graco and Britax car seats tend to expire after six to ten years, depending on what type of seat you have.

2. Sunscreen

2. Sunscreen: Sometimes sunscreen comes without an expiration date, which doesn't mean that it lasts forever. In fact, experts believe that sunscreens are generally effective for only three years, after which they start to lose their effectiveness.

3. Car engine oil

3. Car engine oil: Experts believe that there is no problem in storing engine oil when buying it in large quantities, but it should be known that the chemical properties of the oil change after five years, putting its efficiency at risk.

4. Tea bags

4. Tea bags: When storing tea bags in large quantities in the kitchen, you must check their expiration date, as the tea itself may not spoil, but it may lose its quality after about two years. And according to the manufacturers, tea can be preserved for a longer period by storing it in the freezer.

5. Sunglasses

5. Sunglasses: Don't waste much time looking for a small date printed on your sunglasses, as you won’t find one. Sunglasses are used to protect the eyes from the glare of the sun, as sunglasses block the harmful ultraviolet rays that may cause cancer. Unfortunately, sunglasses become less effective at blocking UV rays over time according to researchers at the University of São Paulo, in part due to normal wear that might scratch the lenses.

6. Paint

6. Paint: Some paint cans do not have an expiration date. However, that does not mean that their quality will remain the same every time you use them. Painting experts advise discarding any paint after opening it after two to four years. Unopened oil paint will stay good for about 15 years, and latex-based paint will stay good for about ten years. Regardless of the time, any moldy, dry, or chipped paint should always be discarded

7. Toothpaste

7. Toothpaste: Toothpaste is an essential product that we use daily, so it is advised not to buy it in bulk, as the expiration date of the tube depends on the manufacturer and brand. Colgate toothpastes, for example, are generally good for only two years from the date of manufacture.

8. Soap bars

8. Soap bars: Soap bars lose their effectiveness over time. Some do have a clear expiration date written on it, but for those that do not, experts recommend storing them for a period of no more than three years. One of the signs that your soap bars expired if they looked dry and cracked.

9. Oxygenated water

9. Oxygenated water: Oxygenated water bottles remain good for 3 years if they are not opened. But once opened, it loses its effectiveness after about six months of opening the cap and exposing it to air.

10. Running shoes

10. Running shoes: Some shoe makers argue that a pair of running shoes should be replaced after running 300 to 600 miles wearing them, as exercising in a pair of shoes increases the wear of the interior lines over time reducing your ability to run efficiently and increasing your risk of being injured.

1. Car seat
2. Sunscreen
3. Car engine oil
4. Tea bags
5. Sunglasses
6. Paint
7. Toothpaste
8. Soap bars
9. Oxygenated water
10. Running shoes
1. Kellogg’s cereal: Frosties/Frosted Flakes:

1. Kellogg’s cereal: Frosties/Frosted Flakes: Although the character on the package “Tony the Tiger” looks the same on most of the boxes, it has different names in different countries. This popular brand of cereals is called "Frosted Flakes" in the US, while this same cereal is called "Frosties " in the UK, Japan, and other countries.

2. The Chocolate bar: Galaxy/Dove:

2. The Chocolate bar: Galaxy/Dove: This well-known chocolate is known in America as “Dove” chocolate, while in Jordan and other middle eastern countries, the UK, Ireland, and India it is known as “Galaxy”. If this is your favorite chocolate and you’re in the U.S. make sure you look for “Dove” chocolate, it looks nearly identical.

3.The Potato chips: Lay’s/Walkers

3.The Potato chips: Lay’s/Walkers: If you’re in Egypt and want “Lay’s” Potato chips, look for “chipsy”, and if you’re in Mexico, look for “Sabritas”, and if you’re in the UK, look for “Walkers”. It comes with different flavors, but has the same taste of the popular potato chips you’re used to.

4.Kellogg’s cereal: Rice Krispies/Rice Bubbles

4.Kellogg’s cereal: Rice Krispies/Rice Bubbles: Known as “Rice Krispies” in the U.S. and “Rice Bubbles” in Australia or New Zealand. Both boxes of cereal feature Snap, Crackle, and Pop but have different names in different countries.

5.The Beverage: Diet Coke/Coca-Cola Light:

5.The Beverage: Diet Coke/Coca-Cola Light: If you’re in the U.S., you’d order “diet coke” while in Europe it’s called Coca-Cola Light. Both would most probably come in a silver can. People who drink this beverage say the diet coke tastes different than the coca-cola light. However, the company claims that it’s the same product with different names.

6.The Frozen Pizza: DiGiorno/Delissio

6.The Frozen Pizza: DiGiorno/Delissio: Known as “DiGiorno” frozen pizza in the U.S. while it’s known as "Delissio" in Canada. Although they have different brand names, they share the same slogan: "It's not delivery. It's Delissio/DiGiorno!"

7. Doritos: Cool ranch flavor/Cool American flavour

7. Doritos: Cool ranch flavor/Cool American flavour: The ranch flavored Doritos are called “Cool Ranch Doritos” in the U.S., while it’s called “Cool American Flavour” Doritos in some European countries as the word “ranch” is considered an American thing. Therefore, the word “ranch” was replaced with “American,” yet it still has the same zesty flavor.

8.Kraft’s boxed Macaroni and Cheese: Kraft Macaroni and Cheese/KD

8.Kraft’s boxed Macaroni and Cheese: Kraft Macaroni and Cheese/KD: The popular "Kraft Macaroni and Cheese" goes by this name in the U.S. while it goes with the name "KD" (Kraft Dinner) in Canada. The name “KD” was derived from customers in Canada who started calling it “KD” instead of “Kraft Dinner” so the company decided to go with it and changed its branding on the packages to KD.

1. Kellogg’s cereal: Frosties/Frosted Flakes:
2. The Chocolate bar: Galaxy/Dove:
3.The Potato chips: Lay’s/Walkers
4.Kellogg’s cereal: Rice Krispies/Rice Bubbles
5.The Beverage: Diet Coke/Coca-Cola Light:
6.The Frozen Pizza: DiGiorno/Delissio
7. Doritos: Cool ranch flavor/Cool American flavour
8.Kraft’s boxed Macaroni and Cheese: Kraft Macaroni and Cheese/KD
1. Silly Putty

1. Silly Putty: Silly Putty was first made by General Electric engineer James Wright from silicone oil and boric acid. The fact that it could bounce was interesting but no one could find a practical application for it until a toy shop owner got her hands on it and immediately saw that it could be used for entertainment rather than industry. Silly Putty didn't become immediately popular. A marketing consultant nearly went bankrupt because of the investment he put into this product until a newspaper story in 1950 created a huge demand for the product. It's been available ever since, bouncing on floors and picking up newsprint for decades.

2. ThighMaster

2. ThighMaster: ThighMaster is an exercise equipment that first gained popularity in the early 1990s. It consists mainly of two pieces of metal tube bent in a loop and connected with a hinge, and it is supposed to help firm and shape the inner thighs. Suzanne Somers was the face of the ThighMaster who contributed to its popularity.

3. Pocket Fisherman

3. Pocket Fisherman: The pocket fisherman seems to solve a problem you didn't know you had. As its name implies, the product is a compact fishing rod that has a notch which can be easily attached to your belt or wrist strap. It has a compartment in the handle that holds hooks, sinkers and other small gear. It can fold up to fit into small compartments.

4. Furbies

4. Furbies: The Furby is an electronic toy that would initially speak its own language but gradually learn English as you interact with it. It could also converse with other Furby toys and use motion sensors to detect when it was being touched or moved around. It was launched in 1998 and gained large popularity at that time.

5. Shake Weight

5. Shake Weight: The Shake Weight consists of a handle and two weights, but it's not a dumbbell. The weights attach to the ends of the central handle via springs. Users should hold the handle in the center and shake it to get a workout. The advertisement contributed to its populararity as according to the ad, a workout for six minutes is equivalent to 5 times working out with normal weights.

6. Roomba

6. Roomba: The Roomba is a vacuum cleaner robot launched in 2002. It was funny to have a robotic disk that rolled around, bumping into things and vacuuming the floor. People laughed at it in the beginning but it was met with success. The engineers behind iRobot developed robots for space exploration and defense projects.

7. BeDazzler

7. BeDazzler: This invention was probably the “fashionistas” favorite device in the 80s as it gave them the opportunity to customize their outfits in a costless, easy way. BeDazzler resembles a manual stapler. You insert a setting and stone in the device, position the fabric or your piece of clothes just right and press down to set your stones. And voila! You got yourself a new customized outfit.

8. The Hula Chair

8. The Hula Chair: The Hula Chair is a chair with a motorized seat that moves in a circular motion as you sit on it. The commercials advertising this product showed people performing normal activities, including office work, while sitting on it doing simultaneous workout and getting massage all at the same time. According to vendors, the chair is meant to help you develop stronger abdominal muscles while simultaneously giving you an invigorating massage in the process.

9. The Flowbee

9. The Flowbee: The Flowbee creates an easy way to cut hair. It is an invention that combines electric shears with a vacuum cleaner. The device pulls your hair through suction and trims it with recessed blades. The vacuum collects all the trimmings. the flowbee advertisement promoted it as a cure to male baldness!

10. The Snuggie

10. The Snuggie: It’s a blanket with sleeves. It wasn't the only nor the first sleeved blanket on the market, but its ad campaigns that included Ellen DeGeneres and Jon Stewart made it popular.

1. Silly Putty
2. ThighMaster
3. Pocket Fisherman
4. Furbies
5. Shake Weight
6. Roomba
7. BeDazzler
8. The Hula Chair
9. The Flowbee
10. The Snuggie
1. Pepsi

1. Pepsi: The founder of Pepsi, Caleb Davis Bradham, originally wanted to become a doctor. However, personal circumstances forced him to give up his dream, and he became a pharmacist instead. His original invention, known as "Brad's Drink," was made from a mix of sugar, water, caramel, lemon oil, and nutmeg. Three years later, Bradham renamed his drink, which he believed aided digestion, to "Pepsi-Cola," taken from the word "dyspepsia", meaning indigestion.

2. Google

2. Google: Google's name emerged from a brainstorming session at Stanford University. Founder Larry Page was coming up with ideas for a massive data-index website with other graduate students, Business Insider reported. One of the suggestions was "googolplex"- one of the largest describable numbers. The name "Google" came about after one of the students accidentally spelled it wrong. Page then registered his company with this name.

3. ZARA

3. ZARA: Zara founder Amancio Ortega originally named his company after the 1964 film "Zorba the Greek. But this didn't last long. The first store, which opened in La Coruña in 1975, happened to be two blocks down from a bar called Zorba, The New York Times reported. Ortega had already made the mold for the letters of his sign when the bar owner told him that it was too confusing for them to have the same name. In the end, Ortega ended up rearranging the letters to make the closest word he could come up with — hence Zara

4. IKEA

4. IKEA: IKEA's name is an acronym of the founder's name Ingvar Kamprad, and the family farm's name where he was born Elmtaryd, and finally his hometown of Agunnaryd to the south of the country.

5. GAP

5. GAP: The first Gap store opened in 1969 with the goal of selling good jeans. The name referred to the generation gap between adults and kids.

6. Amazon

6. Amazon: When Amazon first launched in 1995, founder Jeff Bezos found it challenging to find a name for his brand. Bezos wanted to call his online bookstore Cadabra, according to Brad Stone's book. But Amazon's first lawyer, Todd Tarbert, managed to convince him that the name sounded too similar to "Cadaver." Bezos finally settled on Amazon, named after the largest river in the world, and incorporated an image of the river in the company's first logo.

7. Häagen-Dazs

7. Häagen-Dazs: Reuben Mattus, a Jewish immigrant from Poland, named his ice-cream company Häagen-Dazs as a way to pay tribute to Denmark, according to an interview with the Jewish news publication Tablet Magazine. But the name doesn't actually mean anything. "The only country which saved the Jews during World War II was Denmark, so I put together a totally fictitious Danish name and had it registered," Mattus said.

8. Rolex

8. Rolex: Hans Wilsdorf, the founder of Rolex, wanted a brand name that could be pronounced in any language, Business Insider reported. "I tried combining the letters of the alphabet in every possible way," said Wilsdorf, according to Rolex. "This gave me some hundred names, but none of them felt quite right. One morning, while riding on the upper deck of a horse-drawn omnibus along Cheapside in the City of London, a genie whispered 'Rolex' in my ear."

9. Adidas

9. Adidas: If you, like me, thought Adidas stood for "All Day I Dream About Soccer," you're wrong. It turns out the athletics-apparel brand is named after its founder, Adolf Dassler, who

10. Nike

Nike: The sports famous brand was named after the Greek Goddess of Victory.

1. Pepsi
2. Google
3. ZARA
4. IKEA
5. GAP
6. Amazon
7. Häagen-Dazs
8. Rolex
9. Adidas
10. Nike
1. Maldives

1. Maldives: The Maldives is located in Asia, southwest of Sri Lanka and India in the Indian Ocean. It is such an important touristic spot that attracts tourists from all over the world. The Maldives derives 38.92% of its GDP from tourism.

2. British Virgin Islands

2. British Virgin Islands: A group of nine islands in the Caribbean Sea, located 64 kilometers to the east of Puerto Rico. The British government closed these islands to visitors on March 19. It derives 32.96% of its GDP from tourism.

3. Macao

3. Macao: A special administrative region of the People's Republic of China. It was one of the first places to record a coronavirus case due to its proximity to the Chinese mainland. It derives 28.05% of its GDP from tourism.

4. Aruba

4. Aruba: Aruba is a Dutch island in the Caribbean. It has recorded just 101 coronavirus cases throughout the outbreak and has reported zero cases in June. This region is outside the hurricane belt and derives 27.64% of its GDP from tourism.

5. Vanuatu

5. Vanuatu: Vanuatu is an island located in the South of the Pacific Ocean. The island closed its borders and banned flights between its islands on March 26. The island derives 18.16% of its GDP from tourism.

6. Cape Verde

6. Cape Verde: It is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, and it derives 17.66% of its GDP from tourism. It recorded around 800 COVID-19 cases and began allowing flights between its islands again on June 30.

7. St. Lucia

7. St. Lucia: Saint Lucia is an island located in the Caribbean Sea. It reported less than 20 COVID-19 cases, and it has allowed visitors to come since June 4 with tourists being required to show a negative test result taken within 48 hours of their trip. They are also required to wear a mask while in the country.The island derives 15.61% of its GDP from tourism.

8. Belize

8. Belize: The Caribbean country that derives 14.95% of its GDP from tourism. Belize recorded 22 COVID-19 cases, and its airports and ports have been closed with the cruise trips suspended.

9. Fiji Islands

9. Fiji Islands: Fiji Islands is a country located in the South Pacific Ocean. It recorded less than 20 COVID-19 cases, and as a result, the country's borders have been closed since March 25, allowing citizens only to return. The country derives 14.09% of its GDP from tourism.

10. Malta

10. Malta: Malta is a European country located in the Mediterranean Sea, and it is one of the smallest countries in the world. This European country reported more than 600 COVID-19 cases. The island derives 14.08% of its GDP from tourism.

1. Maldives
2. British Virgin Islands
3. Macao
4. Aruba
5. Vanuatu
6. Cape Verde
7. St. Lucia
8. Belize
9. Fiji Islands
10. Malta

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