#DealOfCentury

US President Donald Trump has reportedly told his close assistants that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu should pay millions of dollars in annual aid to the Palestinian Authority

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Models of an Airbus 350 and Airbus 330 are displayed during the Dubai Airshow in Dubai on November 19, 2019. Emirates Airline said it will buy 50 Airbus 350-900 aircraft in a deal worth $16 billion, with delivery to begin from May 2023. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

Models of an Airbus 350 and Airbus 330 are displayed during the Dubai Airshow in Dubai on November 19, 2019. Emirates Airline said it will buy 50 Airbus 350-900 aircraft in a deal worth $16 billion, with delivery to begin from May 2023. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 300 twin coaxial rotor unmanned helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 300 twin coaxial rotor unmanned helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a general view of visitors walking past aircraft on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a general view of visitors walking past aircraft on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

Men walk past a Chinese-made CAIG Wing Loong II medium altitude long endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

Men walk past a Chinese-made CAIG Wing Loong II medium altitude long endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

People attend the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

People attend the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

A Russian Helicopters presenter holds a model of a VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter at a booth during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

A Russian Helicopters presenter holds a model of a VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter at a booth during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performs stunts at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performs stunts at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

A Yakolev jet is pictured at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

A Yakolev jet is pictured at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

An emirati man watches the United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performing along with an Emirates Airline's Airbus A380 at the Dubai Airshow November 17, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

An emirati man watches the United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performing along with an Emirates Airline's Airbus A380 at the Dubai Airshow November 17, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP

Models of an Airbus 350 and Airbus 330 are displayed during the Dubai Airshow in Dubai on November 19, 2019. Emirates Airline said it will buy 50 Airbus 350-900 aircraft in a deal worth $16 billion, with delivery to begin from May 2023. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 300 twin coaxial rotor unmanned helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a general view of visitors walking past aircraft on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
This picture taken on November 18, 2019 shows a view of a Russian Helicopters VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
Men walk past a Chinese-made CAIG Wing Loong II medium altitude long endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), on display during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
People attend the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
A Russian Helicopters presenter holds a model of a VRT 500 twin coaxial rotor light helicopter at a booth during the 2019 Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performs stunts at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
A Yakolev jet is pictured at the Dubai Airshow on November 18, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
An emirati man watches the United Arab Emirates' air force Aerobatic Team, Al-Fursan, performing along with an Emirates Airline's Airbus A380 at the Dubai Airshow November 17, 2019. KARIM SAHIB / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer holding her kite as she walks away at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer holding her kite as she walks away at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer fixing her board at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer fixing her board at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows tourists reading as a kitesurfer glides on waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows tourists reading as a kitesurfer glides on waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer performing a jump at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer performing a jump at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP

A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer holding her kite as she walks away at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer fixing her board at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows tourists reading as a kitesurfer glides on waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer riding waves at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
A picture taken on October 10, 2019, shows a kitesurfer performing a jump at Dakhla beach in Morocco-administered Western Sahara. In the heart of disputed Western Sahara, a former garrison town has become an unlikely tourist magnet after kitesurfers discovered the windswept desert coast on the Atlantic is perfect for their sport. FADEL SENNA / AFP
Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron). The Israeli army bears full responsibility and the sniper must be brought to justice for so cowardly targeting a journalist (Twitter)

Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron). The Israeli army bears full responsibility and the sniper must be brought to justice for so cowardly targeting a journalist (Twitter)

Palestinian cameraman Mu'ath Amarneh gestures after he was hit on the face by a rubber bullet from Israeli border police during clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces in the village of Surif northwest of the West Bank town of Hebron on November 15, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

Palestinian cameraman Mu'ath Amarneh gestures after he was hit on the face by a rubber bullet from Israeli border police during clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces in the village of Surif northwest of the West Bank town of Hebron on November 15, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

A Palestinian demonstrator takes part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

A Palestinian demonstrator takes part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

Palestinian demonstrators and religious Jewish men belonging to Neturei Karta, a small faction of anti-Zionist ultra-Orthodox Jews who oppose Israel's existence, take part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

Palestinian demonstrators and religious Jewish men belonging to Neturei Karta, a small faction of anti-Zionist ultra-Orthodox Jews who oppose Israel's existence, take part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP

Muath Amarneh, 32, a freelance photographer from the Bethlehem-area Dheisheh refugee camp, was covering protests in the town of Surif alongside several of his colleagues when he was hit (Twitter)

Muath Amarneh, 32, a freelance photographer from the Bethlehem-area Dheisheh refugee camp, was covering protests in the town of Surif alongside several of his colleagues when he was hit (Twitter)

Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

Palestinian journalists launch a campaign in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)

People are showing solidarity with Muath Amarneh by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

People are showing solidarity with Muath Amarneh by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)

Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye yesterday by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron)(Twitter)

Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye yesterday by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron)(Twitter)

Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron). The Israeli army bears full responsibility and the sniper must be brought to justice for so cowardly targeting a journalist (Twitter)
Palestinian cameraman Mu'ath Amarneh gestures after he was hit on the face by a rubber bullet from Israeli border police during clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces in the village of Surif northwest of the West Bank town of Hebron on November 15, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP
A Palestinian demonstrator takes part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP
Palestinian demonstrators and religious Jewish men belonging to Neturei Karta, a small faction of anti-Zionist ultra-Orthodox Jews who oppose Israel's existence, take part in a demonstration in support of Muath Amarneh, a photographer who was hit in the eye last week during clashes between Israeli border police and Palestinian demonstrators in the village of Surif, in front an Israeli checkpoint in the divided Palestinian city of Hebron on November 18, 2019. HAZEM BADER / AFP
Muath Amarneh, 32, a freelance photographer from the Bethlehem-area Dheisheh refugee camp, was covering protests in the town of Surif alongside several of his colleagues when he was hit (Twitter)
Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)
Palestinians are showing solidarity with him by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)
Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)
Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)
Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)
Palestinian journalists launch a campaign  in solidarity with photojournalist Muath Amarneh who lost his left eye because of an Israeli bullet while covering protests in Hebron on 15 November (Twitter)
People are showing solidarity with Muath Amarneh by sharing photos of themselves with one closed eye (Twitter)
Palestinian photojournalist Muath Amarneh lost his left eye yesterday by Israeli sniper fire while covering protests in Surif near Al-Khalil (Hebron)(Twitter)
Iranian protesters gather around a burning motorcycle during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP

Iranian protesters gather around a burning motorcycle during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP

Iranian protesters gather around a fire during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the capital Tehran, on November 16, 2019. One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. Authorities said the move was aimed at helping needy citizens, and expected to generate 300 trillion rials ($2.55 billion) per an

Iranian protesters gather around a fire during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the capital Tehran, on November 16, 2019. One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. Authorities said the move was aimed at helping needy citizens, and expected to generate 300 trillion rials ($2.55 billion) per annum. AFP

Iranians inspect the wreckage of a bus that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan on November 17, 2019. AFP

Iranians inspect the wreckage of a bus that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan on November 17, 2019. AFP

President Hassan Rouhani warned that riot-hit Iran could not allow "insecurity" after two days of unrest killed two people and saw authorities arrest dozens and restrict internet access. AFP

President Hassan Rouhani warned that riot-hit Iran could not allow "insecurity" after two days of unrest killed two people and saw authorities arrest dozens and restrict internet access. AFP

A picture taken on November 17, 2019 shows a scorched branch of Iranian Pasargad bank that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in Eslamshahr, near the Iranian capital of Tehran.  AFP

A picture taken on November 17, 2019 shows a scorched branch of Iranian Pasargad bank that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in Eslamshahr, near the Iranian capital of Tehran. AFP

A man holds a smartphone connected to a Wifi network without internet access at an office in the Iranian capital Tehran on November 17, 2019. Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices. AFP

A man holds a smartphone connected to a Wifi network without internet access at an office in the Iranian capital Tehran on November 17, 2019. Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices. AFP

Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices, a move that sparked nationwide unrest in which he said "some lost their lives". Twitter

Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices, a move that sparked nationwide unrest in which he said "some lost their lives". Twitter

One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. AFP

One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. AFP

Iranian protesters block a road during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP

Iranian protesters block a road during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP

Iranian protesters gather around a burning motorcycle during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP
Iranian protesters gather around a fire during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the capital Tehran, on November 16, 2019. One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. Authorities said the move was aimed at helping needy citizens, and expected to generate 300 trillion rials ($2.55 billion) per an
Iranians inspect the wreckage of a bus that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan on November 17, 2019. AFP
President Hassan Rouhani warned that riot-hit Iran could not allow "insecurity" after two days of unrest killed two people and saw authorities arrest dozens and restrict internet access. AFP
A picture taken on November 17, 2019 shows a scorched branch of Iranian Pasargad bank that was set ablaze by protesters during a demonstration against a rise in gasoline prices in Eslamshahr, near the Iranian capital of Tehran.  AFP
A man holds a smartphone connected to a Wifi network without internet access at an office in the Iranian capital Tehran on November 17, 2019. Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices. AFP
Iran's supreme leader on November 17 threw his support behind a decision to hike petrol prices, a move that sparked nationwide unrest in which he said "some lost their lives". Twitter
One person was killed and others injured in protests across Iran, hours after a surprise decision to increase petrol prices by 50 percent for the first 60 litres and 300 percent for anything above that each month, and impose rationing. AFP
Iranian protesters block a road during a demonstration against an increase in gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan, on November 16, 2019. AFP
Anti-government protesters sit under graffiti depicting Lebanese politicians with joker faces sprayed on a wall in downtown Beirut on November 12, 2019. Banks and schools in Lebanon were closed today as protesters tried to prevent employees from clocking in at state institutions nearly one month into an anti-graft street movement. Unprecedented protests erupted across Lebanon on October 17, demanding the ouster of a generation of politicians seen by demonstrators as inefficient and corrupt.  JOSEPH EID / AF

Anti-government protesters sit under graffiti depicting Lebanese politicians with joker faces sprayed on a wall in downtown Beirut on November 12, 2019. Banks and schools in Lebanon were closed today as protesters tried to prevent employees from clocking in at state institutions nearly one month into an anti-graft street movement. Unprecedented protests erupted across Lebanon on October 17, demanding the ouster of a generation of politicians seen by demonstrators as inefficient and corrupt. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti reading "Revolution...even if you try to silence us" is sprayed on a wall in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti reading "Revolution...even if you try to silence us" is sprayed on a wall in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A woman walks past graffitis sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 6, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A woman walks past graffitis sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 6, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A woman walks past a graffiti drawn on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' portraits from c

A woman walks past a graffiti drawn on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' portraits from city buildings and replaced them with the Lebanese flag. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti by street artist Ashekman is sprayed inside "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti by street artist Ashekman is sprayed inside "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Graffitis are sprayed on a wall in front of "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Graffitis are sprayed on a wall in front of "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Lebanese anti-government protesters paint a graffiti on the ground in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Lebanese anti-government protesters paint a graffiti on the ground in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Graffiti artist Mohammad Abrashh draws a graffiti on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' po

Graffiti artist Mohammad Abrashh draws a graffiti on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' portraits from city buildings and replaced them with the Lebanese flag. JOSEPH EID / AFP

Anti-government protesters sit under graffiti depicting Lebanese politicians with joker faces sprayed on a wall in downtown Beirut on November 12, 2019. Banks and schools in Lebanon were closed today as protesters tried to prevent employees from clocking in at state institutions nearly one month into an anti-graft street movement. Unprecedented protests erupted across Lebanon on October 17, demanding the ouster of a generation of politicians seen by demonstrators as inefficient and corrupt.  JOSEPH EID / AF
A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
A graffiti reading "Revolution...even if you try to silence us" is sprayed on a wall in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
A woman walks past graffitis sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 6, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
A woman walks past a graffiti drawn on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' portraits from c
A graffiti by street artist Ashekman is sprayed inside "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
Graffitis are sprayed on a wall in front of "the Egg" building in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 11, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
Lebanese anti-government protesters paint a graffiti on the ground in central Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
A graffiti is sprayed on a wall in Lebanon's capital Beirut on November 5, 2019. Since October 17, the chanting of tens of thousands of Lebanese denouncing the political elite have shaken the normally staid district around two Beirut squares, Martyrs' and Riad Al Solh. JOSEPH EID / AFP
Graffiti artist Mohammad Abrashh draws a graffiti on the wall of a building at the al-Nour Square in the northern port city of Tripoli on November 7, 2019. An unprecedented protest movement has gripped Lebanon since October 17, demanding an overhaul of a political class that has remained largely unchanged since the end of the country's 1975-1990 civil war. In the northern city of Tripoli, where mobilisation has been relentless since the protests erupted on October 17, demonstrators took down politicians' po

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