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A Yemeni girl stands at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million hav

A Yemeni girl stands at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

A Yemeni girl stands at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced

A Yemeni girl stands at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 mil

Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

Yemeni girls sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have be

Yemeni girls sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

Yemeni children sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have

Yemeni children sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 mil

Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

Yemeni children play at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million hav

Yemeni children play at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

A Yemeni child sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have

A Yemeni child sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

A Yemeni girl sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have

A Yemeni girl sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

A Yemeni child sits in a tent at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been

A Yemeni child sits in a tent at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced across the country, making them vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever due to lack of proper sanitation and healthcare. Nabil ALAWZARI / AFP

A Yemeni girl stands at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million hav
A Yemeni girl stands at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been displaced
Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 mil
Yemeni girls sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have be
Yemeni children sit at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have
Yemeni children are pictured at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 mil
Yemeni children play at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million hav
A Yemeni child sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have
A Yemeni girl sits at the Jaw al-Naseem camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have
A Yemeni child sits in a tent at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of the northern city of Marib, on February 18, 2021 in the Saudi-backed Yemeni government's last northern bastion. Until early last year, life in Marib city was relatively peaceful despite the Yemen's civil war that erupted in 2014. The United Nations warned last week of a potential humanitarian disaster if the fight for Marib continues, saying it has put "millions of civilians at risk". More than 3.3 million have been
A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH

A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded buzzard at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded buzzard at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A staff member works at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A staff member works at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Volunteer at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Joan Scully sorts through knitted nests for injured birds donated by members of the public, at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH /

Volunteer at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Joan Scully sorts through knitted nests for injured birds donated by members of the public, at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH

A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A wild fox is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A wild fox is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher checks wounded swans at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher checks wounded swans at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded pigeon at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded pigeon at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP

A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH
Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded buzzard at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
A two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
A staff member works at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
Volunteer at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Joan Scully sorts through knitted nests for injured birds donated by members of the public, at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH /
A member of staff feeds a two week-old native wild Irish goat which was found on a mountainside and named Liam, at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH
A wild fox is cared for at Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland's new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher checks wounded swans at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
Animal Manager of Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland, Dan Donoher examines a wounded pigeon at their new premises situated behind the Tara na Ri Pub, which is shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, at Garlow Cross outside Navan in County Meath, Ireland on February 18, 2021. Since Ireland's first coronavirus lockdown pub the Tara Na Ri has been closed to regulars, but now it hosts a menagerie of new clientèle as the nation's first wildlife hospital. PAUL FAITH / AFP
Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, works in his land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, works in his land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Carlos Millo, owner of a lodging for tourists, works on his plot of land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 29, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Carlos Millo, owner of a lodging for tourists, works on his plot of land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 29, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, makes a horseshoe at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, makes a horseshoe at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, puts a horseshoe on a horse at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, puts a horseshoe on a horse at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

A man walks by a closed private restaurant in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

A man walks by a closed private restaurant in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

A man passes by a closed handicraft shop in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

A man passes by a closed handicraft shop in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP

Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, smokes a cigar in his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Eduardo Hernandez, owner of a private restaurant and a tobacco cultivator, works in his land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Carlos Millo, owner of a lodging for tourists, works on his plot of land in Vinales, Cuba, on January 29, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, makes a horseshoe at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Yusmani Garcia, a blacksmith and tour guide, puts a horseshoe on a horse at his house in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
A man walks by a closed private restaurant in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
A man passes by a closed handicraft shop in Vinales, Cuba, on January 28, 2021. At the foot of the majestic rock formations of Vinales, the terraces of the restaurants look empty and the lodgings have closed. With the arrival of COVID-19, the incipient prosperity of this Cuban town came to a halt and people abandoned tourism jobs to return to work the land. YAMIL LAGE / AFP
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)

Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
Diego Cusano is an Italy-based artist who calls himself a “Fantasy Researcher” and explores the line between imagination and reality. (Instagram)
A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Franco Sciorilli, an Italian expert, speaks to AFP as he supervises workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, to restore an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Franco Sciorilli, an Italian expert, speaks to AFP as he supervises workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, to restore an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

This picture shows the mosaic flooring of the Saint Mary church, built in 543 AD, the restoration of which was recently completed by workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZ

This picture shows the mosaic flooring of the Saint Mary church, built in 543 AD, the restoration of which was recently completed by workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty. Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp

A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
Franco Sciorilli, an Italian expert, speaks to AFP as he supervises workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, to restore an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
Workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restore a stone wall at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
A worker employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, restores a mosaic floor at an ancient church complex, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZRAAWI / afp
This picture shows the mosaic flooring of the Saint Mary church, built in 543 AD, the restoration of which was recently completed by workers employed by a pilot project run by the UN cultural agency UNESCO, in the small town of Rihab, some 70 kilometres north of the Jordanian capital Amman, on February 9, 2021. In the ruins of the ancient Byzantine church in Jordan, local townspeople and Syrian refugees work side by side on a project that unites preserving cultural heritage and fighting poverty.  Khalil MAZ

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