A mask-clad driver sits behind the wheel in an ambulance in the central Karrada district of Iraq's capital Baghdad on July 1, 2020. AFP
Iraqi lawmaker Ghida Kambash died Friday after contracting the novel coronavirus, parliament announced, its first member to succumb to the virus as its spread ramps up across the country. The 46-year-old was a three-time MP

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Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP

Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
After Syria's war whisked away the silkworms from his mulberry trees, 65-year-old Mohammed Saud instead turned his idle home workshop into a silk museum to celebrate the ancient craft. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
In the green hills of Deir Mama, Saud, his wife and three sons have been making silk for decades. They would raise silk worms in the spring, watching them munch on mulberry tree leaves and slowly build their thick cocoons, before spinning the thread and weaving those coils into fine cloth. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Muhammad Saud, a 65-year-old Syrian silk farmer, handweaves silk threads on a loom at his home workshop in the village of Deir Mama, in west-central Syria on June 22, 2020. MAHER AL MOUNES / AFP
Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP

Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP

Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP

A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Government officials look at a damaged home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Debris litter a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Workers clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
A man walks along a road damaged from recent heavy rains and flooding in the village of Kuma, Kumamoto prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling on July 9 to reach thousands of homes cut off by catastrophic flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
Damaged vehicles are seen under rocks from a mudslide following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
People clear debris and mud outside homes following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
People clear debris and mud outside their home following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Gero, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
A car is seen among debris littering a village following heavy rains and flooding in the village of Takayama, Gifu prefecture on July 9, 2020. Japanese emergency services and troops were scrambling to reach thousands of homes cut off by devastating flooding and landslides that have killed dozens and caused widespread damage. Philip FONG / AFP
Fire brigade officers check on residents following heavy rain in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Torrential rain pounded central Japan on July 8 as authorities said 58 people were feared dead in days of heavy downpours that have triggered devastating landslides and terrifying floods. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP
A worker wades through flood waters as he delivers gas bottles in Kurume, in Fukuoka Prefecture on July 8, 2020. Japan will deploy more troops to search for survivors of devastating floods and landslides that have killed at least 52 people in the southwest of the country, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.

Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh, but was also trusted by rival parties and armed groups, which used him as a mediator. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP

Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP

An Iraqi demonstrator wearing a face mask to protect agaisnt the Covid-19 coronavirus, attends a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. Slogan reads in Arabic: "the voice of right killed with the bullet of wrong". The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
A mourner cries during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Mourners embrace during the funeral of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Iraqi demonstrators attend a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Mourners transport the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups.
Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, during his funeral in Baghdad’s Zayouna district on July 7, 2020. Hashemi was an authoritative voice on Sunni jihadist factions including the Islamic State group, but was also frequently consulted by media and foreign governments on domestic Iraqi politics and Shiite armed groups. He had warm ties with top decision-makers, including President Barham Saleh.
Iraqi demonstrators stage a symbolic funeral for slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, on July 7, 2020 at Baghdad's Tahrir square. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Mourners pray over the coffin of slain Iraqi jihadism expert Hisham al-Hashemi, who was shot dead yesterday outside his house in the Iraqi capital, before his burial on July 7, 2020 in the Shiite shrine city of Najaf in central Iraq. The killing of the 47-year-old prominent expert has stirred fears Iraq is entering a dark and violent phase, as boiling tensions between pro-Iran factions and the government reach new heights. AFP
A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP

The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus.  (pixabay)

The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. (pixabay)

A visitor wearing a protective face mask takes a selfie in front of Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa" also known as "La Gioconda" on the reopening day of the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The coronavirus crisis has already caused "more than 40 million euros in losses" at the Louvre, announced its president and director Jean-Luc Martinez, who advocates a revival through "cultural democratization" and is preparing a "transformation plan" for the upcoming Olympic Games in 2024. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
A visitor wearing face mask stands in front of the Crown of Louis XV held in the Apollo gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum will reopen its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
Visitors wearing face mask stands in front of " The Wedding Feast at Cana " oil on canvas painting by the Italian artist Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) at the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day.FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
A woman wearing face mask takes a pictures as she visit the Louvre Museum in Paris on July 6, 2020, on the museum' s reopening day. FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP
The Louvre museum reopened its doors on July 6, 2020, after months of closure due to lockdown measures linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus.  (pixabay)
A farmer harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on import

A farmer harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lo

This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer holds in his hands wheat kernels during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record low

A farmer holds in his hands wheat kernels during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer walks by a wheat field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boost

A farmer walks by a wheat field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A combine harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on impor

A combine harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer speaks with another riding in a combine harvester in a wheat field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows du

A farmer speaks with another riding in a combine harvester in a wheat field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

Farmers spread around wheat kernels unloaded from a combine harvester before being packaged into sacks, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. Bu

Farmers spread around wheat kernels unloaded from a combine harvester before being packaged into sacks, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer pours a bucket of wheat kernels into a sack during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to

A farmer pours a bucket of wheat kernels into a sack during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer walks with wheat stems in his hand in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record low

A farmer walks with wheat stems in his hand in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lo

This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on imports, mainly from regime ally Russia. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A farmer harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on import
This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lo
A farmer holds in his hands wheat kernels during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record low
A farmer walks by a wheat field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boost
A combine harvests wheat in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows during the war, boosting reliance on impor
A farmer speaks with another riding in a combine harvester in a wheat field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lows du
Farmers spread around wheat kernels unloaded from a combine harvester before being packaged into sacks, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. Bu
A farmer pours a bucket of wheat kernels into a sack during the harvest season, in a field in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus, on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to
A farmer walks with wheat stems in his hand in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus on June 18, 2020. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record low
This picture taken on June 18, 2020 shows wheat stems growing in a field during the harvest season in the countryside of al-Kaswa, south of Syria's capital Damascus. Heavy rain and reduced violence provided a relief to Syrian farmers with a good harvest this year, as a tanking economy leaves millions hungry across his war-torn country. Prior to the outbreak of the conflict in 2011, Syria produced more than 4.1 million tonnes of wheat, enough to feed its entire population. But production plunged to record lo

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