Guess Who is Favorite on Instagram? Its a Bee

Published November 7th, 2019 - 11:24 GMT
Pride, Paris? (Instagram)
Pride, Paris? (Instagram)
Highlights
But she will only work with brands that are actively working with biodiversity and are approved by the Foundation de France, according to CNN.

From an Eiffel Tower selfie to exotic holiday snaps, this Instagram user ticks all the boxes when it comes to nailing the classic influencer pictures.

But the French social media star, known as 'B', isn't the latest street style icon or beauty blogger making a splash on the platform. 

Rather, she is a computer generated bee - and she has an important message to share.

Created by French philanthropic network Fondation de France, 'B' aims to raise awareness of the global decline of the insect through playful posts that mimic social media clichés.


The @bee_nfluencer account, which has racked up nearly 150,000 followers since it launched in April, works with brands to bring in money through sponsored branded posts that is then passed onto the Bee Fund, which supports conservation projects in France.

But she will only work with brands that are actively working with biodiversity and are approved by the Foundation de France, according to CNN.

As well as sharing pictures from her enviable lifestyle, B also share facts about bees, hoping to raise awareness of how they are vital in the ecosystem.  

'If you love to eat, you have to celebrate World Food Day! 

'My sisters and I are behind most of the food you eat everyday. Are you wondering which ones? Comment with a food emoji... and I’ll tell you if it would still exist without me!' one recent post read. 

In another she said: 'On my way to the Montmartre’s 2019 grape harvest festival! 

In another, taken during the September climate protests, she said: 'It is essential to save the planet... And the bees too! 

'Both are threatened and trust me, it would be terrible to live without bees. 

Money earned by B is used by Fondation de France to help rebuild bee habitats, and help farmers in moving toward pollinator-friendly techniques.

Around 30 per cent of France's bee colonies disappear each year, according to the Foundation.  

This article has been adapted from its original source.    


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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