A Danish town has made serving pork mandatory in public institutions

Published January 21st, 2016 - 01:08 GMT
The move has been praised by anti-immigration groups who feared that “Danish food culture” might be banned. (Twitter)
The move has been praised by anti-immigration groups who feared that “Danish food culture” might be banned. (Twitter)

A Danish town has ruled that pork must be served at public institutions in a move which has drawn both criticism and praise. The town council of Randers stated that institutions such a childcare centers must provide “Danish food culture as a central part of the offering — including serving pork on an equal footing with other foods."

The council stressed that there was no intention to force anyone to eat anything that goes against their religious beliefs, however those who oppose the ruling have said that the politicians are trying to “impose a forced ideology” on people.

There has been debate in Denmark since 2013 about whether or not public institutions—such as childcare centers—should be allowed to ban pork products from their menus. Denmark is known for being pork-crazy, with 13 million pigs living there, in comparison to a population of 5.6 million people.

Randers’ decision has been praised by anti-immigration groups. The Danish People’s Party (DPP) said that it was “unacceptable to ban Danish food culture.” The party spokesperson Martin Henriksen explained the party’s position on Facebook.

“The DPP is working nationally and locally for Danish culture, including Danish food culture, and consequently we also fight against Islamic rules and misguided considerations dictating what Danish children eat.”

In November 2013, the DPP pulled out of a tight mayoral campaign in suburban Copenhagen after the incumbent reportedly agreed to serve pork meatballs in public canteens, and bring back the town’s Christmas tree.


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