A time lapse shows what 31 days of Assad's barrel bombs look like

Published August 31st, 2015 - 10:22 GMT
The Syrian government has for years been accused of dropping crude barrel bombs on civilian areas, most recently in the Damascus suburb of Douma. (AFP/File)
The Syrian government has for years been accused of dropping crude barrel bombs on civilian areas, most recently in the Damascus suburb of Douma. (AFP/File)

This week the Syrian government is accused of bombing a Damascus suburb — again. 

UK-based war monitor Syrian Observatory for Human Rights confirmed claims of government fire in the suburb city of Saqba, where at least ten people were killed and an unknown more injured in the latest in a string of such incidents. 

If you follow the Syrian conflict even a little, this isn't all that novel. Just earlier this month a deadly strike hit a bustling marketplace in the capital's suburb of Douma, killing over 100 people and injuring at least 200.

Back then, harrowing footage emerged of dust-encrusted children being dug out from piles of rubble, bleary-eyed medics standing in empty streets, and a bloodied father frozen in a makeshift hospital, holding the body of his young daughter. 

Those images were hard to process, but harder to comprehend is the fact that scenes like these have become the everyday reality for areas surrounding Damascus.

Earlier this month, non-profit organization The Syria Campaign released time lapse video showing 31 days of barrel bombs during month of July, when the organization says 1,350 bombs killed almost 1000 civilians across the country.

An endless loop plays ambient noise from bombing aftermaths, while white numbers reflecting death tolls stretch across the screen, reminding us that strikes like Douma's are only one small piece of a much larger tragedy.

 

 


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