Brazil's new president is a Lebanese politician in more ways than one

Published June 3rd, 2016 - 04:00 GMT
Brazil's new president Michel Temer is accused of more corruption scandals than his predecessor Dilma Roussef, making the country's Lebanese-Brazilian head of state a Lebanese politician in more ways than just one.  (AFP/Evaristo Sa)
Brazil's new president Michel Temer is accused of more corruption scandals than his predecessor Dilma Roussef, making the country's Lebanese-Brazilian head of state a Lebanese politician in more ways than just one. (AFP/Evaristo Sa)

That 'Lebanese' president of Brazil you're proud of is very corrupt, like Lebanese politicians

In the surge of Lebanese pride that one of their “own” is now the president of Brazil, while the country celebrates its second year without an actual Lebanese president in Lebanon, not one outlet has bothered to look into Mr. Michel Temer, beyond the fact that his parents immigrated from Btaaboura around 80 years ago.

His interviews with Lebanese media during his first and last visit to his “motherland” a couple of years ago have been circulating like wildfire. Him proclaiming to have a “Brazilian heart” but “Lebanese blood” were on a loop. He probably couldn’t care less.

Continue reading on A Separate State of Mind

 

Shall we think of war victims as humans, not numbers? 

According to a recent report by the UNOCHA, an estimated 21.2 million people – 82 percent of the total population of Yemen – need humanitarian assistance. This report was published one year after the armed conflict escalated across Yemen. The report noted that 14.4 million Yemenis are vulnerable to food insecurity, 19.4 million people do not have access to clean water and sanitation system, and 14.1 million citizens of Yemen are without adequate healthcare. According to the 8th Task Force Population movement report released in April by the UN protection cluster in Yemen, 2.7 million people are internally displaced within Yemen due to the ongoing conflict. Yemen is a country with an estimated population of 26 million, an estimate that shows that we have 26 million war stories to be told each from a different perspective. 

Continue reading on LSE Middle East Centre Blog

 

For Odars who love Armenians 

I remember when I told my mother that my partner was Armenian—and how quickly she answered, “When do you think her parents will kill you?” She was kidding, of course, but this joke hints at a certain truism many of us grew up with: Armenians are not supposed to be romantically involved with non-Armenians.

My mother and I are not Armenian, but we are from Iran. We share many parts of Armenian culture, and for generations we have lived near each other, if not in contact, sharing spaces, histories and traditions. But still our identity is known under a different name. For this reason, my mother knew enough to worry for her son’s new romance—at least enough to make a cheap joke.

Continue reading on The Hye-Phen 

 

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