'It wants the sky to see it'

Published May 15th, 2016 - 04:43 GMT
"I breathe the clear air and think about the wet ground reflecting Aleppo’s image as if it wants the sky to see it," writes Mazen, a Syrian who lived in Aleppo before the war.  (Hovic via Flickr Creative Commons)
"I breathe the clear air and think about the wet ground reflecting Aleppo’s image as if it wants the sky to see it," writes Mazen, a Syrian who lived in Aleppo before the war. (Hovic via Flickr Creative Commons)

The Citadel   

Every time I visited the citadel and those markets, I truly felt like I was living in those ages. And as you walked towards them, you would see children on the way to school, adding some beauty to your morning.

The best view is when it rains. The ground shines like a mirror, reflecting everything around it. When I stand in front of the citadel, I think about its greatness, and how many important people lived inside those walls. I breathe the clear air and think about the wet ground reflecting Aleppo’s image as if it wants the sky to see it.

Continue reading on Qisetna   

 

Iranian and Arab women photographers tell their own stories   

Arab and Iranian women are a favorite obsession of the West. That obsession usually turns on two questions: how do they dress and are they oppressed? Of course, this narrow lens obscures the true picture of womanhood in the Arab and Iranian world. It also disempowers Arab and Iranian women, by making them the object rather than the subject of their own stories.

A new exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, in Washington D.C., is, however, flipping the script, handing the camera to the women themselves, and giving them a stage to present their experiences and realities to American audiences.

Continue reading on Muftah 

 

Sins of the father: extremist fighters' children live in stateless limbo in Iraq 

Nour Adel* is just over a year old now. But already the little Iraqi girl is persona non grata in her own community. Adel is the child of Wafa, a woman from near the central-southern city of Tikrit, and Adel, a farmer from near Hawija in northern Iraq.

Wafa* met Adel when she and her family were forced to leave Tikrit after the area was overrun by the extremist group known as the Islamic State. The extremists had threatened to kill or arrest all the men in the area so the family decided to flee. Wafa’s family ended up in Hawija where they have relatives who took them in.

“A few months later, I married Adel,” Wafa told NIQASH. “He was a very religious person and very calm. He used to work as a farmer until he went to join the Islamic State. I begged him not to go. He left his daughter and me a few months after we married and I was told he was in Baiji. Then other people told me he was in Ramadi. Right now I have no idea where he is and he hasn’t called us at all,” she explains.

Continue reading on Niqash 

 

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