A photographer's journey into post-Daesh Palmyra

Published April 3rd, 2016 - 07:04 GMT
Palmyra's Arc of Triumph, seen on March 31, 2016, and in the photograph in March 2014.  Daesh fighters destroyed the monument in September 2015 (AFP/Joseph Eid)
Palmyra's Arc of Triumph, seen on March 31, 2016, and in the photograph in March 2014. Daesh fighters destroyed the monument in September 2015 (AFP/Joseph Eid)

Writing history in Palmyra  

I break out into a grin when I see the famous Roman theatre, still standing upright. But my smile falls away when my eyes land on the Arch of Triumph, which was completely destroyed. I head towards what is left of the Temple of Bel, whose stones rest on top of one another on the hot earth under the noon sun. Sprouting among the stones were bright yellow flowers.

This is just the beginning.

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