'Yemen has become an island'

Published April 1st, 2016 - 07:00 GMT
A man walks past rubble in Sanaa's historic district following airstrikes.  (AFP/Mohammed Huwais)
A man walks past rubble in Sanaa's historic district following airstrikes. (AFP/Mohammed Huwais)

Yemen's forgotten journalists

At least eight journalists have been killed – and many more abducted by Houthi militias – while covering the conflict in Yemen since the beginning of 2015, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). 

Though the conflict in Yemen gets far less international press attention than Syria’s civil war, the dangers for journalists can be just as deadly. “There is little to no coverage by international media based in the Yemeni capital, Sana'a,” said Thuraya Dammaj, a Yemeni activist and journalist for the official Yemen news agency, Saba Net. 

Continue reading at Your Middle East

 

Salahi's garden and what's inevitable

Ibrahim El-Salahi is a Sudanese artist, an important figure in African and Arab modernism. El-Salahi is considered a pioneer in Sudanese art and was a member of the Khartoum School that was founded by Osman Waqialla.

Hassan Musa writes about El-Salahi (he first heard stories about him when he was a teenage boy): “I was fascinated by the idea that an ordinary Muslim man could live as an artist, because in my imagination they were unreal creatures who came out of European literature”.

Continue reading at Middle East Revised 

 

Times I thought I was going to die in Lebanon  

When I first arrived in Lebanon a few years back, my mom told me not to speak English in cabs, because there were rumors of chauffeurs kidnapping foreigners. Ever since that summer I’ve been scared of them and absolutely refuse to answer a phone, speak, or even utter a simple word, such as “please” or “sorry,” in English. Be it the lies our parents feed us as children to keep us close and safe, or the instability of the country, there are times you might fear for your life in Lebanon. The following are times I didn’t feel the slightest bit safe.

Continue reading at NOW.

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