French Health Minister Receives The AstraZeneca Covid-19 Vaccine

Published February 8th, 2021 - 12:27 GMT
French Health Minister Olivier Veran receives a dose of the AstraZeneca-Oxford Covid-19 vaccine at the South Ile-de-France Hospital Group (Groupe Hospitalier Sud Ile-de-France), in Melun, on the outskirts of Paris, on February 8, 2021 during an AstraZeneca vaccine injections campaign for people under the age of 65. Thomas SAMSON / POOL / AFP
French Health Minister Olivier Veran receives a dose of the AstraZeneca-Oxford Covid-19 vaccine at the South Ile-de-France Hospital Group (Groupe Hospitalier Sud Ile-de-France), in Melun, on the outskirts of Paris, on February 8, 2021 during an AstraZeneca vaccine injections campaign for people under the age of 65. Thomas SAMSON / POOL / AFP
Highlights
'We do our best to prevent the spread of variants,' he added. 

French health minister Olivier Veran has received the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine today as he praised the jab for providing sufficient protection against 'nearly all the variants' of the coronavirus.

Veran was seen on French television with his shirt off while being inoculated at a vaccination centre in the city of Melun near Paris.

It comes after South Africa has halted use of AstraZeneca's Covid shot in its vaccination programme amid fears that it gave minimal protection against mild-to-moderate infection caused by the country's dominant coronavirus variant.

But Veran reassured the French public and showed his support for the AstraZeneca jab on Monday.

He told reporters: 'The AstraZeneca vaccine reinforces and amplifies our vaccination strategy.

'We do our best to prevent the spread of variants,' he added. 

A British junior health minister said there was no evidence that the AstraZeneca vaccine did not prevent death or serious illness, and added South Africa had only imposed a temporary halt on using the vaccine.       

South Africa is suspending the start of its Covid-19 vaccinations with the AstraZeneca jab after a study showed the drug failed to prevent mild and moderate cases of the virus variant that has appeared in the country.

Africa's hardest-hit nation was due to start its campaign in the coming days with a million doses of the vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford.

The suspension marks an important setback for the country, but officials said vaccine deliveries from other producers would soon be available and allow the campaign to move forward.

'It's a temporary issue that we have to hold on AstraZeneca until we figure out these issues,' Health Minister Zweli Mkhize told reporters during a virtual press conference.

The University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, which conducted the trial, said in a statement on Sunday that the AstraZeneca vaccine 'provides minimal protection against mild-moderate Covid-19 infection' from the South African variant.

But in a full paper due to be published on Monday, AstraZeneca said that none of the 2,000 participants developed serious symptoms.

That could mean it will still have an effect on severe illness, although not enough data is available yet to make a definitive judgment.

Lagging behind in the global vaccination race, South Africa received its first delivery of a million doses on Monday.

An additional 500,000 doses are expected this month.

All are AstraZeneca vaccines produced by the Serum Institute of India, and some 1.2 million health workers were to be first in line for the shots.

'In the next four weeks, we will have the J&J and Pfizer,' said Mkhize, referring to vaccines made by Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer/BioNTech.

Discussions with other vaccine producers are also ongoing, particularly Moderna and the makers of the Russian Sputnik V jab.

Mkhize recently announced having reserved 20 million Pfizer/BioNTech doses.

The 1.5 million AstraZeneca vaccines obtained by South Africa, which will expire in April, will be kept until scientists give clear indications on their use, he said.

'The second generation of the vaccine to fight all variants will take longer to produce,' said Salim Abdool Karim, epidemiologist and co-chair of the scientific committee at the South African health ministry.

This article has been adapted from its original source.


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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