Iran Responds to Saudi Accusing it of 'Direct Military Aggression'

Published November 8th, 2017 - 02:43 GMT
"If you think that Iran is not your friend and that the United States and the Zionist regime [Israel] are, you are making a strategic and analytical error" (AFP/FIle)
"If you think that Iran is not your friend and that the United States and the Zionist regime [Israel] are, you are making a strategic and analytical error" (AFP/FIle)

 

  • Rouhani warned Saudi Arabia it will get nothing from threatening Iran
  • A war of words between the regional heavyweights has intensified recently
  • The Iranian president responded after Saudi accused Iran of delivering missiles to Yemeni rebels
  • Repeated attempts to bring about a negotiated settlement to the Yemen conflict have failed 

Iran has warned Saudi Arabia they face the might of the Islamic republic if they continue to make war threats.

President Hassan Rouhani warned Saudi Arabia on Wednesday that it will achieve nothing by threatening the might of Iran, as a war of words between the regional heavyweights intensifies.

"You know the might and place of the Islamic republic. People more powerful than you have been unable to do anything against the Iranian people," Rouhani said.

His comments came after Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman accused Iran of delivering missiles to Yemeni rebels for use against targets in the kingdom that he described as "direct military aggression."

Iran strongly denied supplying any missiles to the rebels saying that it would have been impossible to do so in any case in the face of a Saudi-led air and sea blockade.

Rouhani reiterated that Iran wanted a peaceful settlement of the conflict between the rebels and the Saudi-backed Yemeni government and of other wars around the region that have placed it at loggerheads with Riyadh.

"We want the welfare and development of Yemen, Iraq, and Syria, and of Saudi Arabia too. There are no other paths forward than friendship, brotherhood and mutual assistance," he said.

"If you think that Iran is not your friend and that the United States and the Zionist regime [Israel] are, you are making a strategic and analytical error."

 

 

Yesterday, Saudi Arabia moved a step closer to a war with Iran by accusing the country again of "direct military aggression" by supplying militias with rockets.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman made the accusation Tuesday, referring to Iran handing ballistic missiles to Yemen's Houthi rebels, state media reported.

But Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels hit back with threats of retaliation against the ports and airports of the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, which this week closed the Yemeni land, sea and air borders.

"All airports, ports, border crossings and areas of any importance to Saudi Arabia and the UAE will be a direct target of our weapons, which is a legitimate right," read a statement released by the rebels' political office.

The Houthi's statement comes the day after the coalition announced it had closed all of Yemen's borders after the missile attack which the Houthis have claimed.

The United Nations on Monday reported the Saudi-led coalition had prevented two humanitarian aid flights from flying to the war-torn country.

"Iranian interventions in the region are detrimental to the security of neighboring countries and affect international peace and security," Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir warned yesterday.

 

 

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif issued dismissive tweets over the kingdom of Saudi Arabia in response.

"KSA bombs Yemen to smithereens, killing 1000s of innocents including babies, spreads cholera and famine, but of course blames Iran," he said.

"KSA is engaged in wars of aggression, regional bullying, destabilizing behavior & risky provocations. It blames Iran for the consequences."

Critics have accused the Saudi-led coalition of not doing enough to prevent civilian deaths in its air war in Yemen, where more than 8,650 people have been killed since the intervention began.

Repeated attempts to bring about a negotiated settlement to the conflict have failed, including a series of U.N.-backed peace talks.

Saudi Arabia has blamed the Houthis for the failed efforts, and on Monday offered rewards totaling $440 million for information on 40 senior officials among the rebels.

Topping the list, with a $30-million reward for tips leading to his capture, was the group's leader Abdulmalik al-Houthi.

The Houthis, allied with Yemen's ex-president Ali Abdullah Saleh in the conflict, have captured the capital Sanaa, forcing Hadi's government to operate from the southern city of Aden.

 

This article has been adapted from its original source.

 


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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