Ivanka Trump Officially Registers as a Republican After Years of Voting Democrat

Published March 3rd, 2020 - 07:54 GMT
vanka Trump, daughter of and Senior Advisor to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference 2020 (CPAC) hosted by the American Conservative Union on February 28, 2020 in National Harbor, MD. Samuel Corum/Getty Images/AFP Samuel Corum / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP
vanka Trump, daughter of and Senior Advisor to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference 2020 (CPAC) hosted by the American Conservative Union on February 28, 2020 in National Harbor, MD. Samuel Corum/Getty Images/AFP Samuel Corum / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP
Highlights
As she gears up to hit the trail for her father's re-election campaign, Ivanka sat down with the Times to explain her political evolution.  

Ivanka Trump has officially become a registered Republican for the first time after years of voting Democrat and supporting liberal causes.  

'I am a proud Trump Republican,' Ivanka declared in a New York Times interview on Monday, revealing that she had registered red so she can vote for her father Donald Trump in the New York state primary next month.  

Ivanka and her husband Jared Kushner, both senior White House advisers, were registered Democrats for years, known to donate to liberal candidates and causes.

She's been seen as a more moderate member of Team Trump, having been outspoken about her progressive views on issues such as gay rights, gun control and climate change. 

But she now says that she is fully on the side of her father, who she says has 'broadened the reach of the Republican Party, which is really important to me.'  

According to the New York City Board of Elections, Ivanka finally made the switch from blue to red in October 2018, right before the midterm elections. 

Neither Ivanka nor her brother Eric voted in the 2016 primary election because they failed to register as Republicans before the deadline.  

As she gears up to hit the trail for her father's re-election campaign, Ivanka sat down with the Times to explain her political evolution.  

'I'm not going to speculate on the projections other people have cast upon me,' Ivanka said when asked about her conservative shift.  

'In areas outside of my portfolio, I tend to agree more with the more conservative viewpoint more often than where the Democrats are today.' 

'No one person or party has a monopoly on good ideas,' she added.

Ivanka's husband Jared revealed that he had changed his party affiliation to Republican late last year.  

'I was not a Republican. Now I'm a Republican,' Jared told reporters in December. 

'I think the Republican Party is growing now that people like me feel comfortable being part of it.'  

At another point in the interview, Ivanka boasted about her 'record-shattering' fundraising efforts, noting how she raised $2million in under an hour at a campaign event in Houston. 

She hopes to repeat that success this spring as she is scheduled to headline four events in Oklahoma, Texas, Florida and New York City with a goal of raising millions from first-time donors. 

In addition to becoming more active in her father's campaign, Ivanka has also amped up her public support for him in interviews and on social media. 

Across most of her tenure as senior White House adviser, Ivanka has avoided commenting on various controversies surrounding the president, often dodging media questions by insisting the subjects were out of her purview. 

But in recent months she's become a lot more vocal about her disapproval with her father's rivals, especially in the wake of the impeachment trial.

After the trial ended in acquittal last month, Ivanka tweeted: 'This factional fever and incoherent, ill-conceived process has finally ended and the President has rightfully been acquitted. 

'POTUS has accomplished so much and is just getting started. The best is yet to come!' 

She doubled down on those comments in a rare TV appearance on Sean Hannity's Fox News program the same day.  

After running down a list of Trump administration accomplishments, Ivanka stated: 'For us not to come together as a nation and celebrate America's success is not forgivable.' 

Ivanka declined to comment to the Times about which Democrat she would like to see take on her father in the November general election. 

She called every candidate in the field 'very unique' and said that regardless of who ends up earning the nomination, she feels 'good about our chances of beating them all'.   

This article has been adapted from its original source.


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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