Majority of Jordanians Think Economic Problems Biggest Challenge, Poll Reveals

Published November 2nd, 2017 - 09:00 GMT
28 percent of the national sample said that electricity is the biggest burden on their families’ budgets (Shutterstock/File)
28 percent of the national sample said that electricity is the biggest burden on their families’ budgets (Shutterstock/File)

 

  • A poll revealed 81 percent of Jordanians think economic problems are the biggest challenges the country faces
  • The poll saw a decrease in the percentage of those who believe Jordan is moving in the right direction
  • Reasons for the government’s “inability” to shoulder responsibilities were attributed to economic conditions, high unemployment, and the government’s failure in addressing corruption
  • 28 percent said that electricity is the biggest burden

 

Economic problems topped challenges that face the Kingdom, according to 81 percent of the national sample that responded to a recent opinion poll, whose findings were announced on Wednesday.

Conducted by the University of Jordan’s Centre for Strategic Studies (CSS) one year after the formation of Prime Minister Hani Mulki’s second government, economic problems were regarded as the top concern of 84 percent of opinion leaders.

The survey divides respondents into two categories: grassroots — or the “national sample” — and opinion leaders, according to CSS website. 

In the poll, the national sample consisted of 1,824 individuals above the age of 18 with an equal representation of men and women, who were chosen from 162 locations nationwide, while the opinion leaders sample included a random group of 700 people categorized into seven groups of 100 members each, according to the center.

Conducted between Oct. 15 and 24, the poll involved a total of 52 field researchers, with a margin of error of 2.5 percent.

41 percent of the national sample believed that things were going in the right direction in Jordan, registering a seven percent drop from April’s survey.

On the other hand, 34 percent of opinion leaders said that things were on the right track, going down by 21 percent from the previous poll, which was carried out 200 days after the formation of Mulki's government.

 

 

In the most recent survey, more than one third of the national sample said they believed that the government was able to shoulder its responsibilities in the "past phase" (Cabinet with 35 percent, premier alone 34 percent and the ministerial team excluding the premier with 34 percent), marking a 9 percent drop from April poll. 

Opinion leaders gave the government a better evaluation for shouldering its responsibilities (Cabinet with 39 percent, premier alone 41 percent and the ministerial team excluding the premier 40 percent), yet the assessment dropped by more than 8 percent compared with April poll, according to the CSS. 

The national sample’s reasons for the government’s perceived “inability” to shoulder responsibilities were mainly attributed to economic conditions, high unemployment rates (38 percent), lack of achievements and reforms (23 percent), the government’s failure in addressing corruption (14 percent). 

On the other side, the opinion leaders’ assessment was based on weak performance of the premier and the ministerial team (26 percent), lack of achievements and reforms (24 percent) and weak planning and management (16 percent), among others.

Poll results showed a slight drop in the assessment of national sample and opinion leaders of the government’s ability to address main issues listed in the Royal Letter of Designation.

On this issue, findings showed a decline in the national sample’s evaluation from 48 percent in April to 45 percent in this poll, while opinion leaders’ assessment dropped from 54 to 46 percent.

 

 

As for the national sample’s assessment to the economic conditions of their families, 57 percent of them said that their current conditions are worse than a year ago, 11 percent said their conditions are better than a year ago, while 32 percent said that their conditions were still the same.

As for personal economic outlook in the next 12 months, 44 percent of the grassroots sample said their status would be worse than now, 26 percent expected them to improve and 25 percent said that their conditions would not change.

Regarding the Kingdom’s current economic conditions, compared to the past 12 months, 70 percent of opinion leaders said that current conditions are worse than a year ago, 25 percent said they are the same and only 5 percent said that Jordan’s economic status improved.

As for expectations on the country’s economic conditions, 19 percent of opinion leaders expressed their optimism of having better conditions, while 49 percent said that the economic situation would become worse.

28 percent of the national sample said that electricity is the biggest burden on their families’ budgets, followed by food and beverages with 24 percent, homes (13 percent), higher education (11 percent) and health (10 percent).

On their responses to economic challenges, 34 percent of the national sample said they chose to reduce expenditure, 27 percent delayed buying expensive goods and services, while 20 percent had to borrow to buy needs and face high costs of living.

 

This article has been adapted from its original source.

 

 


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