Sudanese Protesters Return to The Street One Year After Bloody Crackdown

Published June 4th, 2020 - 06:03 GMT
Scores of protesters were killed when armed men in military fatigues stormed the sprawling encampment outside Khartoum's army headquarters on June 3 last year. ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP
Scores of protesters were killed when armed men in military fatigues stormed the sprawling encampment outside Khartoum's army headquarters on June 3 last year. ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP

Sudanese protesters took to the streets of Khartoum Wednesday, angrily demanding justice for scores of pro-democracy demonstrators killed a year ago in a bloody crackdown.

The popular mass movement had already brought down long-time ruler Omar al-Bashir but was still on the streets demanding further reforms when it was attacked by men in military fatigues on June 3, 2019.

"We won't forget and we won't forgive," read one Arabic-language protest sign held up by a mask-clad Sudanese woman as scores of other protesters rallied and the smoke of burning car tyres blackened the sky, AFP reported.

At least 128 people were killed and hundreds more wounded in the attack outside Khartoum's army headquarters, according to doctors linked to the protest movement. Official figures say at least 87 died.


The attackers in military fatigues perpetrated "murder, torture, rape, sexual violence, enforced disappearance of persons and potentially other inhumane acts," says a March report by the US-based group Physicians for Human Rights.

One protester held up a large photo of Abdulsalam Kisha, a 25-year-old protester who was killed in the attack last year.

The dead man's father, Kisha Abdulsalam, told AFP days ago that he still held out hope the killers would be brought to justice by post-revolution authorities.

"We demand an international probe to ensure justice for those killed," said Kisha, a leading member of a campaign group for the families of protest victims.

A memorial portrait of his slain son has been painted on the Khartoum house of the bereaved father, who has two other sons and a daughter.

He recalled the day he heard the shocking news.

"I rushed to the protest site after receiving multiple random phone calls saying my son had died," he said, only to find out later the young man was killed by multiple gunshots.

Sudan's transitional authorities, which came to power in August last year, with Bashir behind bars, have formed a committee to probe the violence, but it has yet to announce its findings.

In July last year, an initial probe by Sudan's military officials and prosecutors showed that some members of the RSF and other security forces were involved in the killings.

This article has been adapted from its original source.


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