Tunisia Parliament Rejects Govt of PM-Designate Jemli After Months of Talks

Published January 11th, 2020 - 07:06 GMT
Tunisia's Prime Minister-designate Habib Jemli addresses parliamentarians during a plenary session in the capital Tunis, on January 10, 2020, for a confidence vote on his proposed cabinet line-up. Jemli unveiled on January 2, a proposed government composed of independent figures, after months of negotiations between political parties to fill positions failed. The cabinet of 28 ministers, most of whom are unknown to the general public, including four women, needs to receive parliamentary assent. FETHI BELAID
Tunisia's Prime Minister-designate Habib Jemli addresses parliamentarians during a plenary session in the capital Tunis, on January 10, 2020, for a confidence vote on his proposed cabinet line-up. Jemli unveiled on January 2, a proposed government composed of independent figures, after months of negotiations between political parties to fill positions failed. The cabinet of 28 ministers, most of whom are unknown to the general public, including four women, needs to receive parliamentary assent. FETHI BELAID / AFP
Highlights
Ennahdha said its choice was "based on a person known for his competence, integrity and experience in administration".

The Tunisian parliament on Friday rejected the government of Prime Minister-designate Habib Jemli after months of negotiations between political parties to fill positions.

Jemli, an independent, was nominated by the Islamist inspired Ennahdha party after it came out top in legislative polls in October but failed to win enough seats to form a majority in the 217-seat chamber. 

Deputies voted 134 to 72 against Jemli's proposed government of independent figures due to "frictions" between the parties over political appointments.

President Kais Saied now has ten days to choose a new prime minister-designate who will attempt to put together a government acceptable to the assembly.

An agricultural engineer by training, Jemli served as secretary of state at the agriculture ministry from 2011 to 2014 under Ennahdha prime ministers Hamadi Jebali and Ali Larayedh.

Ennahdha said its choice was "based on a person known for his competence, integrity and experience in administration".

The constitution stipulates that if the prime minister-designate fails to receive parliamentary assent for his government, the president will launch talks with political parties and parliamentary blocs to mandate someone else to form an administration.

This article has been adapted from its original source.


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