Is QAnon Creeping Into US Congress and Police? Twitter Crackdown Highlights Group's Spread and Popularity

Published July 23rd, 2020 - 09:35 GMT
Is QAnon Creeping Into US Congress and Police? Twitter Crackdown Highlights Group's Spread and Popularity
QAnon first made it to headlines in 2016 as they voiced support for President Trump, claiming that he is "facing strong resistance by a criminal elite organization. (RICK LOOMIS / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP)

Despite Twitter's recent crackdown against accounts promoting QAnon conspiracy theories, social media users couldn't help but notice that the group's ideas are still strongly influencing major politicians.

Known for unconventional conspiracy theories, supporters of the far-right QAnon group have come under Twitter's scrutiny recently; as the popular social network decided to "control and limit conspiracy theories online," which resulted in removing over 7k Twitter accounts so far.

As we approach 2020 US elections and as a result of the controversy triggered following the alleged Russian involvement in President Trump's win in 2016, social media platforms are exerting unusual effort to stop "misleading" and "disputed" content to stop foreign entities from interfering in the US elections. 

Although it's not an officially recognized organization, QAnon first made it to headlines in 2016 as they voiced support for President Trump, claiming that he is "facing strong resistance by a criminal elite organization that has been ruling the United States for decades." 

QAnon believers have also pushed a narrative in which they claim that "the deep state will do anything to oust Trump or even kill him."

The group, highly in favor of Trump, has made several appearances in Trump's political rallies over the last years but has recently been regarded as a threat to US democracy, especially after the FBI has designated it as a "domestic terrorist organization" in 2019.

The group famous for associating Democratic politicians such as Hillary Clinton and Barak Obama with the "criminal ring designed to overthrow" President Trump has also been facing accusations of anti-Semitism especially as they heavily targeted the Jewish billionaire George Soros.

Yet, news of the Twitter campaign against QAnon was entirely welcomed by social media users, who argued that QAnon "has already made it to politics," citing a Georgia politician who has announced her intention to run for Congress after publicly supporting QAnon."

Twitter commentators also shared photos of a Republican candidate for the Senate from Arizona, saying she's a QAnon supporter, and another New York candidate using the group's hashtag.

Additionally, some expressed their concern that QAnon might have already gained support within the circles of people in leadership roles, especially after the head of the New York Police Department's second-largest police union appeared on Fox News with a QAnon mug behind him.

 


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