Why Is the UAE's First Jewish Wedding Legal, When Gatherings Are Not?

Published December 1st, 2020 - 07:23 GMT
Why Is the UAE's First Jewish Wedding Legal, When Gatherings Are Not?
The video showed a wedding ceremony reportedly taking place at the Park Hyatt resort in Dubai. (Facebook)

Months after the UAE signed the Abraham Accords with Israel, the Emirate of Dubai hosted the very first Jewish wedding last week, with photos and videos being widely shared across social media networks.

As part of the Israeli media campaign to show the changes to its relationship with Middle Eastern countries recently normalizing relations with them, the Arabic-speaking official Twitter account of the Israeli government has posted the video of what they said is "the first official Jewish wedding in the UAE."

The video which showed a wedding ceremony reportedly taking place at the Park Hyatt resort in Dubai featured dozens of individuals in traditional Jewish attire dancing during the celebration. Photos shared online, later on, showed a number of people dressed in Emirati traditional clothes being present at the ceremony.

Translation: "Jewish settlers in their traditional clothes take pride in holding the first Jewish wedding ceremony in Dubai, without even the slightest respect for the state's laws, which emphasized precautionary measures and social distancing for COVID19. "

Other viral photos showed the wedding reception held later that day, with Hebrew banners all around. However, the wedding didn't seem to adhere to social distancing rules imposed in the country, as social gatherings and celebrations carry out fines that vary between 5,000 and 10,000 AED, due to COVID-19 measures.

Translation: "Jewish wedding in Dubai"

Last September, the UAE, Bahrain, and Israel signed the Abraham Accords promoted by the US President Donald Trump, inaugurating full diplomatic ties between them.

Only recently, did the UAE government announce various reforms of social laws to allow its non-Muslim residents to follow their own rules when it comes to marriages, divorces, inheritance, and other issues, even though at least 12% of the country's population is Christian and about 13% belong to other religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Sikhism.


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