10 Of The Most Bizarre Buildings Around the World

Published March 10th, 2020 - 08:21 GMT

As famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright expressed, the environment and architecture should organically blend into each other. But the designs you’re about to see could only blend into the dark pages of a supervillain comic!

 

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#1. Philadelphia City Hal

#1. Philadelphia City Hal: Philadelphia City Hall is the world’s largest free standing masonry building made of brick, white marble, limestone and granite and functions The building was designed by Scottish-born architect John McArthur Jr. and Thomas Ustick Walter[8] in the Second Empire style, and was constructed from 1871 to 1901 at a cost of $24 million. City Hall's tower was completed by 1894,[1] although the interior wasn't finished until 1901. Designed to be the world's tallest building, it was surpassed during construction by the Washington Monument and the Eiffel Tower.

#2. Mahanakhon Tower

#2. Mahanakhon Tower: King Power MahaNakhon formerly known as MahaNakhon is a mixed-use skyscraper in the Silom/Sathon central business district of Bangkok, Thailand. It was opened in December 2016 It features the unconventional appearance of a glass curtain walled square tower with a cuboid-surfaced spiral cut into the side of the building Following transfer of the first residential units in April 2016, at 314.2 metres (1,031 ft) with 77 floors, it was recognized as the tallest building in Thailand on 4 May 2016 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

#3. Polygone Riviera France

#3. Polygone Riviera France: Polygone Riviera is a shopping center located in Cagnes-sur-Mer in the Alpes-Maritimes in France and inaugurated on October 21, 2015 , The shopping center occupies an area of 70,000 m 2 northwest of the city center of Cagnes-sur-Mer and is the result of an investment of 350 million euros shared equally between Unibail-Rodamco and Socri, specialist in luxury hotels and commercial real estate , During the preparatory phases, promoters expect 8 to 10 million annual visitors and the creation of 1,500 jobs Management announces that the center welcomed 7 million visitors in 2018

#4. Hallgrimskirkja Iceland Church

#4. Hallgrimskirkja Iceland Church: Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country , The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns , State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson's design of the church was commissioned in 1937. He is said to have designed it to resemble the trap rocks, mountains and glaciers of Iceland's landscape The design is similar in style to the expressionist architecture of Grundtvig's Church of Copenhagen, Denmark, completed in 1940.

#5. Expiatori del Sagrat cor

#5. Expiatori del Sagrat cor: The Temple Expiatori del Sagrat Cor Expiatory Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is a Roman Catholic church and minor basilica located on the summit of Mount Tibidabo in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The building is the work of the Spanish architect Enric Sagnier and was completed by his son Josep Maria Sagnier i Vidal. The construction of the church lasted from 1902 to 1961.

#6. Temppeliaukio Church

#6. Temppeliaukio Church: Temppeliaukio Church is a Lutheran church in the Töölö neighborhood of Helsinki. The church was designed by architects and brothers Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen and opened in 1969. Built directly into solid rock, it is also known as the Church of the Rock and Rock Church.

#7. Basque Health Department Headquarters

#7. Basque Health Department Headquarters: The new headquarters of the Basque Health Department in Bilbao is a brilliant block of glass and steel designed by architect Juan Coll- Barreu. The most important feature is its polyhedral glass façade that allows light into the interior, making it a transparent, luminous space. Despite being very new, it has already become one of the landmarks of the capital of Bizkaia. The British newspaper “The Guardian” has even likened it to the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao.

#8. Aiguille du midi

#8. Aiguille du midi: The Aiguille du Midi (3,842 m (12,605 ft) is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif within the French Alps. It is a popular tourist destination and can be directly accessed by cable car from Chamonix that takes visitors close to Mont Blanc The idea for a cable car to the summit, the Téléphérique de l'Aiguille du Midi, was originally proposed around 1909, but did not come into operation until 1955 when it held the title of the world's highest cable car for about two decades. It still holds the record as the highest vertical ascent cable car in the world

#9. Ostankino Tower

#9. Ostankino Tower: Ostankino Tower is a television and radio tower in Moscow, Russia, owned by the Moscow branch of unitary enterprise Russian TV and Radio Broadcasting Network. Standing 540.1 metres (1,772 ft), Ostankino was designed by Nikolai Nikitin. It is currently the tallest free-standing structure in Europe and 11th tallest in the world. Between 1967 and 1974, it was the tallest in the world. The tower was the first free-standing structure to exceed 500 m (1,600 ft) in height. Ostankino was built to mark the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution. It is named after the surrounding Ostankino district of Moscow

#10. Nakagin Capsule Tower

#10. Nakagin Capsule Tower: The Nakagin Capsule Tower is a mixed-use residential and office tower designed by architect Kisho Kurokawa and located in Shimbashi, Tokyo, Japan. Completed in just 30 days in 1972, the building is a rare remaining example of Japanese Metabolism, an architectural movement emblematic of Japan's postwar cultural resurgence. It was the world's first example of capsule architecture built for permanent and practical use. The building still exists but has fallen into disrepair As of October 2012, around thirty of the 140 capsules remained in use as apartments, while others were used for storage or office space, or simply abandoned and allowed to deteriorate.

#1. Philadelphia City Hal
#2. Mahanakhon Tower
#3. Polygone Riviera France
#4. Hallgrimskirkja Iceland Church
#5. Expiatori del Sagrat cor
#6. Temppeliaukio Church
#7. Basque Health Department Headquarters
#8. Aiguille du midi
#9. Ostankino Tower
#10. Nakagin Capsule Tower
#1. Philadelphia City Hal
#1. Philadelphia City Hal: Philadelphia City Hall is the world’s largest free standing masonry building made of brick, white marble, limestone and granite and functions The building was designed by Scottish-born architect John McArthur Jr. and Thomas Ustick Walter[8] in the Second Empire style, and was constructed from 1871 to 1901 at a cost of $24 million. City Hall's tower was completed by 1894,[1] although the interior wasn't finished until 1901. Designed to be the world's tallest building, it was surpassed during construction by the Washington Monument and the Eiffel Tower.
#2. Mahanakhon Tower
#2. Mahanakhon Tower: King Power MahaNakhon formerly known as MahaNakhon is a mixed-use skyscraper in the Silom/Sathon central business district of Bangkok, Thailand. It was opened in December 2016 It features the unconventional appearance of a glass curtain walled square tower with a cuboid-surfaced spiral cut into the side of the building Following transfer of the first residential units in April 2016, at 314.2 metres (1,031 ft) with 77 floors, it was recognized as the tallest building in Thailand on 4 May 2016 by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat
#3. Polygone Riviera France
#3. Polygone Riviera France: Polygone Riviera is a shopping center located in Cagnes-sur-Mer in the Alpes-Maritimes in France and inaugurated on October 21, 2015 , The shopping center occupies an area of 70,000 m 2 northwest of the city center of Cagnes-sur-Mer and is the result of an investment of 350 million euros shared equally between Unibail-Rodamco and Socri, specialist in luxury hotels and commercial real estate , During the preparatory phases, promoters expect 8 to 10 million annual visitors and the creation of 1,500 jobs Management announces that the center welcomed 7 million visitors in 2018
#4. Hallgrimskirkja Iceland Church
#4. Hallgrimskirkja Iceland Church: Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country , The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns , State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson's design of the church was commissioned in 1937. He is said to have designed it to resemble the trap rocks, mountains and glaciers of Iceland's landscape The design is similar in style to the expressionist architecture of Grundtvig's Church of Copenhagen, Denmark, completed in 1940.
#5. Expiatori del Sagrat cor
#5. Expiatori del Sagrat cor: The Temple Expiatori del Sagrat Cor Expiatory Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is a Roman Catholic church and minor basilica located on the summit of Mount Tibidabo in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The building is the work of the Spanish architect Enric Sagnier and was completed by his son Josep Maria Sagnier i Vidal. The construction of the church lasted from 1902 to 1961.
#6. Temppeliaukio Church
#6. Temppeliaukio Church: Temppeliaukio Church is a Lutheran church in the Töölö neighborhood of Helsinki. The church was designed by architects and brothers Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen and opened in 1969. Built directly into solid rock, it is also known as the Church of the Rock and Rock Church.
#7. Basque Health Department Headquarters
#7. Basque Health Department Headquarters: The new headquarters of the Basque Health Department in Bilbao is a brilliant block of glass and steel designed by architect Juan Coll- Barreu. The most important feature is its polyhedral glass façade that allows light into the interior, making it a transparent, luminous space. Despite being very new, it has already become one of the landmarks of the capital of Bizkaia. The British newspaper “The Guardian” has even likened it to the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao.
#8. Aiguille du midi
#8. Aiguille du midi: The Aiguille du Midi (3,842 m (12,605 ft) is a mountain in the Mont Blanc massif within the French Alps. It is a popular tourist destination and can be directly accessed by cable car from Chamonix that takes visitors close to Mont Blanc The idea for a cable car to the summit, the Téléphérique de l'Aiguille du Midi, was originally proposed around 1909, but did not come into operation until 1955 when it held the title of the world's highest cable car for about two decades. It still holds the record as the highest vertical ascent cable car in the world
#9. Ostankino Tower
#9. Ostankino Tower: Ostankino Tower is a television and radio tower in Moscow, Russia, owned by the Moscow branch of unitary enterprise Russian TV and Radio Broadcasting Network. Standing 540.1 metres (1,772 ft), Ostankino was designed by Nikolai Nikitin. It is currently the tallest free-standing structure in Europe and 11th tallest in the world. Between 1967 and 1974, it was the tallest in the world. The tower was the first free-standing structure to exceed 500 m (1,600 ft) in height. Ostankino was built to mark the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution. It is named after the surrounding Ostankino district of Moscow
#10. Nakagin Capsule Tower
#10. Nakagin Capsule Tower: The Nakagin Capsule Tower is a mixed-use residential and office tower designed by architect Kisho Kurokawa and located in Shimbashi, Tokyo, Japan. Completed in just 30 days in 1972, the building is a rare remaining example of Japanese Metabolism, an architectural movement emblematic of Japan's postwar cultural resurgence. It was the world's first example of capsule architecture built for permanent and practical use. The building still exists but has fallen into disrepair As of October 2012, around thirty of the 140 capsules remained in use as apartments, while others were used for storage or office space, or simply abandoned and allowed to deteriorate.