Covid Art Through Greek Mythology

Published June 14th, 2021 - 07:19 GMT

A neo-muralist from Athens seeks to combine ancient Greek mythology with Byzantine iconography to create graffiti and street art to depict how the Coronavirus forced people the worldover to put down roots.

Artist Fikos has painted the walls of many cities, including Bangkok, Rabat and Zurich and he is currently adding a splash of color to the sun-beaten facades of the Cypriot capital Nicosia.

"Here in Cyprus there are not many murals yet," the artist says. "It's the beginning phase of the street art scene in Cyprus, so... they are impressed and kind of awed when they see this happening."

Fikos was born in 1987 in Athens, the city he still calls home. When he was 13, he started studying Byzantine painting under the guidance of George Kordis, with whom he would collaborate with for 5 years, painting murals in Orthodox churches, while simultaneously developing his own personal artistic style.

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Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", works on one of his murals in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 04, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

A cat sits next to a mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 7, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

A Cypriot man rides his moped past a mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 07, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

A mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", is pictured on a building on Stasikratous Street, a major shopping area in the center of Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 07, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", works on one of his murals in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 04, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. Instagram

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

Fikos was born in 1987 in Athens. Instagram

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

Fikos was born in 1987 in Athens. Instagram

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography

Cyprus’ capital is known as Nicosia in English, but it’s real name is Lefkosia (meaning White, or White Essense). Instagram

Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", works on one of his murals in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 04, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
A cat sits next to a mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 7, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
A Cypriot man rides his moped past a mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 07, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
A mural by Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", is pictured on a building on Stasikratous Street, a major shopping area in the center of Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 07, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. David VUJANOVIC / AFP
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Greek artist Fikos, who describes himself as a "neo-muralist", works on one of his murals in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on June 04, 2021. An Athenian "neo-muralist" is blending Greek mythology and Byzantine iconography with graffiti and street art to depict how the coronavirus has forced people the world over to put down roots. Instagram
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos was born in 1987 in Athens. Instagram
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Fikos was born in 1987 in Athens. Instagram
Fikos tries to combine ancient Greek mythology with the Byzantine iconography
Cyprus’ capital is known as Nicosia in English, but it’s real name is Lefkosia (meaning White, or White Essense). Instagram