How to Save The Syrian Pound?

Published September 17th, 2019 - 06:29 GMT

Currency fluctuations in Syria are "insane".

The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation.

In the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria, governed by a semi-autonomous Kurdish administration, the situation is just as grim. The slide of the Syrian pound has impacted all the Syrian people.

The situation is catastrophic, the value of the dollar is very unstable, and prices are rising every day.

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A merchant counts Syrian pound notes, bearing a portrait of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A merchant counts Syrian pound notes, bearing a portrait of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A merchant counts money in front of his shop at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant counts money in front of his shop at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant prepares lunch inside his shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus . The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A merchant prepares lunch inside his shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus . The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A woman pays a merchant at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A woman pays a merchant at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

 The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

Shoppers walk through the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

Shoppers walk through the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

A merchant arranges stacks of Syrian pounds at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on September 10, 2019. The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant arranges stacks of Syrian pounds at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on September 10, 2019. The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

Women gaze at the window of a jewelry shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

Women gaze at the window of a jewelry shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

Women run errands at the Bzourieh market in the center of Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

Women run errands at the Bzourieh market in the center of Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP

The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant holds a Syrian pound note, bearing a portrait of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant holds a Syrian pound note, bearing a portrait of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP

A merchant counts Syrian pound notes, bearing a portrait of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant counts money in front of his shop at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant prepares lunch inside his shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus . The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A woman pays a merchant at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
 The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
Shoppers walk through the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant arranges stacks of Syrian pounds at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on September 10, 2019. The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
Women gaze at the window of a jewelry shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
Women run errands at the Bzourieh market in the center of Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant holds a Syrian pound note, bearing a portrait of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant counts Syrian pound notes, bearing a portrait of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant counts Syrian pound notes, bearing a portrait of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant counts money in front of his shop at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant counts money in front of his shop at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant prepares lunch inside his shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus . The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant prepares lunch inside his shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus . The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A woman pays a merchant at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A woman pays a merchant at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
 The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
Shoppers walk through the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
Shoppers walk through the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian capital Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
A merchant arranges stacks of Syrian pounds at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on September 10, 2019. The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant arranges stacks of Syrian pounds at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria on September 10, 2019. The declining value of the pound is a sure sign of Syria's ailing economy. The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. A flurry of international sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's regime and associated businessmen since the start of the war in 2011 has compounded the situation. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
Women gaze at the window of a jewelry shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian.  LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
Women gaze at the window of a jewelry shop at the Bzourieh market in the centre of the Syrian. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
Women run errands at the Bzourieh market in the center of Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
Women run errands at the Bzourieh market in the center of Damascus. LOUAI BESHARA / AFP
The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
The civil war has battered the country's finances and depleted its foreign reserves. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant holds a Syrian pound note, bearing a portrait of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria.  Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP
A merchant holds a Syrian pound note, bearing a portrait of late Syrian President Hafez al-Assad, at a market in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP