Mobile Cinema Brings Charlie Chaplin Pranks to Syria's Kurdish Children

Published August 20th, 2019 - 06:31 GMT

In Kurdish-held areas of the northeast, filmmaker Shero Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen.

With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria.

Lively piano music rings out across the school basketball court, as Chaplin plays a tramp who rescues an orphaned baby in the 1921 silent movie.

Laughter rises above the darkened playground as he tries to clean the baby's nose or to feed him from a kettle strung from the ceiling.

The mobile cinema aims to introduce young children to the magic of the silver screen from the early days of moving pictures -- something he missed out on as a schoolboy. The mobile cinema's objective is also to screen films linked to protecting the environment and personal freedoms.

Beyond their roving cinema, they dream of opening a movie theatre at a fixed location.

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A woman uses a cell phone to shoot a video of children attending a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

A woman uses a cell phone to shoot a video of children attending a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. (Twitter)

Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. (Twitter)

A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a laptop connected to a projector and screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a laptop connected to a projector and screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

 Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a projector screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a projector screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP

A woman uses a cell phone to shoot a video of children attending a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. (Twitter)
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a laptop connected to a projector and screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
 Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a projector screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A woman uses a cell phone to shoot a video of children attending a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A woman uses a cell phone to shoot a video of children attending a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. (Twitter)
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. (Twitter)
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a laptop connected to a projector and screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a laptop connected to a projector and screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Children attend a film screening as part of the mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative organised by Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde, at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
 Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
Hinde is screening films in remote villages using just a laptop, projector and a canvas screen. With some films dubbed into Kurdish and others subtitled, he and a team of volunteers want to spread their love of cinema across Rojava, the Kurdish name of the semi-autonomous northeast of war-torn Syria. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a projector screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019.  DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP
A member of Syrian-Kurdish filmmaker Shero Hinde's mobile cinema "Komina Film" initiative prepares a projector screen for a film screening for children at a school yard in the village of Shaghir Bazar, 55 kilometres southest of Qamishli in the Kurdish-populated areas of northeastern Syria's Hasakeh province, on July 28, 2019. DELIL SOULEIMAN / AFP