From radio broadcasts to mobile apps: Inside Daesh’s propaganda machine

Published November 26th, 2015 - 08:31 GMT

Not long ago, a typical Al Qaeda video was grainy footage of Osama bin Laden murmuring in a rural Afghan cave. Now, militant Sunnis have upped their game. Daesh runs some of the best social media campaigns in the world, with high-definition videos, radio broadcasts, video games and a glossy monthly magazine. And it's working: So far, over 20,000 foreign fighters are estimated to have traveled to the "caliphate" in Syria and Iraq. 

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al bayan isis radio

Daesh runs a radio station called Al-Bayan, which covers the group’s military operations in Iraq and Syria. The station broadcasts in Arabic, Kurdish, French, Russian and English. Al Bayan is headquartered in Mosul but has correspondents throughout the region. The Washington Post said Al Bayan sounds “eerily like NPR.”

You’ve probably heard about Daesh’s glossy magazine, Dabiq. The magazine is published monthly in English, and seeks to convince Muslim men and women from around the world to immigrate to Daesh's so-called "caliphate."

You’ve probably heard about Daesh’s glossy magazine, Dabiq. The magazine is published monthly in English, and seeks to convince Muslim men and women from around the world to immigrate to Daesh's so-called "caliphate."

The magazine features transcripts of the final statements of suicide bombers, interviews with the leaders of ISIS affiliates in other parts of the world, and lots of quotes from the Quran, the prophet Muhammad, and 7th & 8th century Islamic leaders.

The magazine features transcripts of the final statements of suicide bombers, interviews with the leaders of ISIS affiliates in other parts of the world, and lots of quotes from the Quran, the prophet Muhammad, and 7th & 8th century Islamic leaders.

Daesh media

Dabiq Magazine is published by Al Hayat, Daesh’s media center, which was founded in 2014 and whose logo appears to have been ripped off from Al Jazeera. Both Dabiq and Al Hayat evolved out of Al Qaeda In Iraq’s Al Furqan media foundation, which was started after the American invasion of Iraq to drum up support for the insurgency.

Daesh propaganda

Daesh has also developed an Arabic-language mobile app that advertises itself as providing the latest news from Syria, Iraq and the Islamic World. The app is called “The Dawn of Glad Tidings” and has been around since 2014. It was available for Android users in the Google Play store until people complained and Google yanked it from the shelf.

ISIS video game

Daesh has also created video games, posters, CDs, DVDs and other forms of media to push its radical ideology on young Muslims around the world. The group is reportedly producing propaganda in over 20 different languages, according to FBI Director James Comey.

ISIS Twitter feed

Daesh militants and supporters both love Twitter. Twitter management usually shuts down Daesh-affiliated accounts, but Daesh users simply create new accounts.

al bayan isis radio
You’ve probably heard about Daesh’s glossy magazine, Dabiq. The magazine is published monthly in English, and seeks to convince Muslim men and women from around the world to immigrate to Daesh's so-called "caliphate."
The magazine features transcripts of the final statements of suicide bombers, interviews with the leaders of ISIS affiliates in other parts of the world, and lots of quotes from the Quran, the prophet Muhammad, and 7th & 8th century Islamic leaders.
Daesh media
Daesh propaganda
ISIS video game
ISIS Twitter feed
al bayan isis radio
Daesh runs a radio station called Al-Bayan, which covers the group’s military operations in Iraq and Syria. The station broadcasts in Arabic, Kurdish, French, Russian and English. Al Bayan is headquartered in Mosul but has correspondents throughout the region. The Washington Post said Al Bayan sounds “eerily like NPR.”
You’ve probably heard about Daesh’s glossy magazine, Dabiq. The magazine is published monthly in English, and seeks to convince Muslim men and women from around the world to immigrate to Daesh's so-called "caliphate."
You’ve probably heard about Daesh’s glossy magazine, Dabiq. The magazine is published monthly in English, and seeks to convince Muslim men and women from around the world to immigrate to Daesh's so-called "caliphate."
The magazine features transcripts of the final statements of suicide bombers, interviews with the leaders of ISIS affiliates in other parts of the world, and lots of quotes from the Quran, the prophet Muhammad, and 7th & 8th century Islamic leaders.
The magazine features transcripts of the final statements of suicide bombers, interviews with the leaders of ISIS affiliates in other parts of the world, and lots of quotes from the Quran, the prophet Muhammad, and 7th & 8th century Islamic leaders.
Daesh media
Dabiq Magazine is published by Al Hayat, Daesh’s media center, which was founded in 2014 and whose logo appears to have been ripped off from Al Jazeera. Both Dabiq and Al Hayat evolved out of Al Qaeda In Iraq’s Al Furqan media foundation, which was started after the American invasion of Iraq to drum up support for the insurgency.
Daesh propaganda
Daesh has also developed an Arabic-language mobile app that advertises itself as providing the latest news from Syria, Iraq and the Islamic World. The app is called “The Dawn of Glad Tidings” and has been around since 2014. It was available for Android users in the Google Play store until people complained and Google yanked it from the shelf.
ISIS video game
Daesh has also created video games, posters, CDs, DVDs and other forms of media to push its radical ideology on young Muslims around the world. The group is reportedly producing propaganda in over 20 different languages, according to FBI Director James Comey.
ISIS Twitter feed
Daesh militants and supporters both love Twitter. Twitter management usually shuts down Daesh-affiliated accounts, but Daesh users simply create new accounts.