Thailand Starts Sterilizing its Lopburi Monkeys

Published June 23rd, 2020 - 05:55 GMT

The town of Lopburi is located about 155km north of Bangkok. It is well known for having large amount of monkeys and becoming a good place for tourism in Thailand.

Lopburi's monkey population has doubled to 6,000 in the last 3 years. After the coronavirus pandemic hit the country, authorities were forced to start a sterilization campaign.

COVID-19 cases in Thailand stands at 3151 and hailed for recording zero new virus infections in nearly a month.

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This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking juice in front of the Prang Sam Yod Buddhist temple in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking juice in front of the Prang Sam Yod Buddhist temple in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking yoghurt in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking yoghurt in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A veterinarian performs a sterilisation on a longtail macaque in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A veterinarian performs a sterilisation on a longtail macaque in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A park ranger tattoos a longtail macaques before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A park ranger tattoos a longtail macaques before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

Longtail macaques pull the tail of a cat in an abandoned building in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

Longtail macaques pull the tail of a cat in an abandoned building in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A longtail macaque tears down a poster reading "Don't feed the monkeys" in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A longtail macaque tears down a poster reading "Don't feed the monkeys" in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A park ranger carries a longtail macaque before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A park ranger carries a longtail macaque before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows longtail macaques sitting on a rooftop in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows longtail macaques sitting on a rooftop in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A Thailand flag is seen in the background as longtail macaques take a bath to cool down from the heat in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

A Thailand flag is seen in the background as longtail macaques take a bath to cool down from the heat in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking juice in front of the Prang Sam Yod Buddhist temple in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking yoghurt in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A veterinarian performs a sterilisation on a longtail macaque in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger tattoos a longtail macaques before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
Longtail macaques pull the tail of a cat in an abandoned building in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A longtail macaque tears down a poster reading "Don't feed the monkeys" in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger carries a longtail macaque before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows longtail macaques sitting on a rooftop in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A Thailand flag is seen in the background as longtail macaques take a bath to cool down from the heat in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking juice in front of the Prang Sam Yod Buddhist temple in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking juice in front of the Prang Sam Yod Buddhist temple in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking yoghurt in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows a longtail macaque drinking yoghurt in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A veterinarian performs a sterilisation on a longtail macaque in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A veterinarian performs a sterilisation on a longtail macaque in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger tattoos a longtail macaques before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger tattoos a longtail macaques before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
Longtail macaques pull the tail of a cat in an abandoned building in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
Longtail macaques pull the tail of a cat in an abandoned building in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A longtail macaque tears down a poster reading "Don't feed the monkeys" in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A longtail macaque tears down a poster reading "Don't feed the monkeys" in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger carries a longtail macaque before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A park ranger carries a longtail macaque before its sterilisation in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows longtail macaques sitting on a rooftop in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
This picture taken on June 20, 2020 shows longtail macaques sitting on a rooftop in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A Thailand flag is seen in the background as longtail macaques take a bath to cool down from the heat in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP
A Thailand flag is seen in the background as longtail macaques take a bath to cool down from the heat in the town of Lopburi, some 155km north of Bangkok, on June 21, 2020. Lopburi's monkey population, which is the town's main tourist attraction, doubled to 6,000 in the last three years, forcing authorities to start a sterilisation campaign. Mladen ANTONOV / AFP

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