6 Tips to Help You Get Along with Your Coworkers

Published July 16th, 2018 - 12:05 GMT
You typically spend eight hours of your day with those people, thus, it is essential to make sure you get along with everyone to reach your common goals and success metrics. Starting and maintaining friendly relationships will ease your day at work and help you work better. (Shutterstock)
You typically spend eight hours of your day with those people, thus, it is essential to make sure you get along with everyone to reach your common goals and success metrics. Starting and maintaining friendly relationships will ease your day at work and help you work better. (Shutterstock)

We can choose our friends and the people we hang out with everyday, right? Unfortunately, we can’t apply this to the office; we can’t always choose our colleagues at work and the team we are part of. Regardless of your job or industry, you will definitely be faced with situations where you must work with individuals or groups that are on a whole different level than you are in terms of interests, characters and personalities.

This is the reality and we must learn how to cope with it.

Our workplace environment is changing often, and diversity is present more than ever. You work with people of different ages, cultures, approaches and interests. You typically spend eight hours of your day with those people, thus, it is essential to make sure you get along with everyone to reach your common goals and success metrics. Starting and maintaining friendly relationships will ease your day at work and help you work better.

But, you may wonder, how do you exactly do that?

Check out the tips below to help you get along with everyone at work. Also, these are tricks to turn challenges into learning sources. You can learn something new from each and everyone around you.

Ready? Here we go:

  1. Focus on the goals

Don’t focus on the differences between you and your colleague, instead keep your focus on the one common thing you both are working on. You may not be working in the same department or have the same seniority level but you have met under the same company name to work towards its goals.

We have this habit of focusing on what separates us from each other, as opposed to what we have in common. Always thing about what you share with your coworkers and use that a springboard towards a healthy and productive relationship (i.e. you don’t have to fall in love with everyone’s personalities, but you can manage to co-exist and cooperate on the same items).

Another fallacy is when many people think that they are the only ones in the office who actually do the work and others are slacking off all the time.

Well, if you find yourself having those thoughts, go and ask your colleagues (in a friendly not a bossy kind of way) what projects they’ve been working on. You might actually find out they have loads of work compared to yours and that will give you a good reality check.

  1. Understand other’s best intentions

We are prone to be sensitive when it comes to performance and professional critique. The first thing that comes to mind after a harsh feedback would be “my boss hates me” or “they just want to fault and pick on me”.  

Since there is no such thing as perfect in the professional sphere, try to think of critiques as a constructive feedback to improve your weakness points.

You manager or boss or colleague is trying to help you develop your skills to work efficiently towards the same goals the have to report on at the end of each month and year. It is far from just pointing fingers.

Understanding intentions and giving people the benefit of the doubt applies to many other situations. Some coworkers have a lot of tasks and responsibilities to get done. So if you send an email without having a reply, don’t assume you are being ignored. Send a follow up email or give them a polite reminder by passing by their office. You never know what’s holding them up.  

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  1. Ask questions

One major workplace conflict is a result of denial. When employees are not willing to acknowledge that they don’t understand a task or a program, then major challenges arise.

Colleagues and coworkers are you best references when you are in doubt, whether it is about a new software or a new unfamiliar project. Use every advice someone gives you, they have been there and experienced better. No need to reinvent the wheel to avoid the scary “I don’t know how to do this” statement.

Also, many people like it when there is a chance to talk about themselves or when a topic of their expertise comes in the conversation.

If you are not sure who the expert in who is, just ask. Get to know your coworkers by asking them about their hobbies or what they like to do. Use this to break the ice and present to others that you are engaged. Then move on to ask for help and support.

This trick works really well in a diverse workplace. Get to know others on a deeper level and understand different cultures. Regardless of your own personal background or others, you are all in the same team working towards the same goals and want success to be in for everyone around.

  1. Find different opinions

Being in a workplace that doesn’t have a clone copy of everyone is an advantage, and in most cases, it drives creativity and innovation.

People who have different career paths, experiences, work in different industries or have observed different things before becoming your colleagues are more likely to contribute their different perspective, unique ideas, solutions, and valuable information.

  1. Communicate clearly, not impulsively

When a conflict shows up at your workplace, make sure you don’t react immediately. Calm yourself before handling any situation or saying anything that may jeopardize your relationships or even your career. Give it an hour or two or maybe sleep on the issue before addressing it. This way you will give yourself the chance to think clearly and fairly.

Also, if you find yourself the cause of the conflict or problem, or you have unintentionally offended anyone, stand up and apologize and let them feel that you have acknowledged your mistake.

  1. Make sure you follow office etiquette

It is important to practice office etiquette with your colleagues and coworkers regardless of your point of view or how comfortable you feel around them.

This includes being polite and courteous to each and everyone at the office, making phone calls that don’t distract anyone, keeping your voice down, practicing effective listening, and paying good attention when sending work emails.

By Haneen Kawar

This article originally appeared in Bayt.com. This article and all other intellectual property on Bayt.com is the property of Bayt.com. Reproduction of this article in any form is only permissible with written permission from Bayt.com.


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