Russian Conglomerate Sues Boeing Over Delayed Deliveries of Max 8

Published August 28th, 2019 - 08:25 GMT
Avia demands the return of $35 million the Russian company paid to secure the order for the airplanes, $75 million for lost profits and $115 million in compensatory damages.
Avia demands the return of $35 million the Russian company paid to secure the order for the airplanes, $75 million for lost profits and $115 million in compensatory damages. (Shutterstock)
Highlights
Boeing has been working for months to recertify the 737 Max
A subsidiary of a Russian state-owned conglomerate has filed a lawsuit against Boeing for postponing deliveries of dozens of its Max 8 airliners, which have been grounded worldwide since March.

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Avia Capital Services filed the suit in Chicago, where Boeing is headquartered. It accuses the plane maker of intentionally hiding information about the airworthiness of the MAX 8 before two deadly crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia grounded the global fleet.

"Initially fixed supply dates for airliners were regrettably postponed for known reasons for three years, from October 2019 to March 2022," a representative for Avia told Russian state news agency TASS.

"We at the same time made upfront payments and sustain losses. If the management of Boeing shows goodwill, we are ready to sit down to talk and find a mutually beneficial off-court decision on compensation of sustained losses."

Boeing has been working for months to recertify the 737 Max, following critical updates to its Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which prevents a plane from stalling. None of the Max 7s or Max 8s will return to the skies until the software fix is approved by the FAA and installed on all the grounded aircraft.

The automated system has been blamed for the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, which occurred within six months of each other and killed a combined 346 people.

In the lawsuit, Avia demands the return of $35 million the Russian company paid to secure the order for the airplanes, $75 million for lost profits and $115 million in compensatory damages.


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