World Trade Primed for Strong, Uneven Recovery

Published April 4th, 2021 - 09:05 GMT
World Trade Primed for Strong, Uneven Recovery
World GDP at market exchange rates should increase by 5.1% in 2021 and 3.8% in 2022, after contracting by 3.8% in 2020. (Shutterstock)
Highlights
Travel services were down 63% in 2020 and are not expected to fully recover until the pandemic wanes.

The volume of world merchandise trade is expected to increase by 8% in 2021 after having fallen 5.3% in 2020, continuing its rebound from the pandemic-induced collapse that bottomed out in the second quarter of last year, said the WTO.

Prospects for a quick recovery in world trade have improved as merchandise trade expanded more rapidly than expected in the second half of last year, according to new estimates from the WTO.

Main points

• World GDP at market exchange rates should increase by 5.1% in 2021 and 3.8% in 2022, after contracting by 3.8% in 2020.

• Merchandise trade in nominal dollar terms fell in 2020 by 7% while commercial services exports declined by 20%.

• Falling oil prices led to a 35% contraction in trade in fuels in 2020.

• Travel services were down 63% in 2020 and are not expected to fully recover until the pandemic wanes.

Trade growth should then slow to 4.0% in 2022, and the effects of the pandemic will continue to be felt as this pace of expansion would still leave trade below its pre-pandemic trend.

The relatively positive short-term outlook for global trade is marred by regional disparities, continued weakness in services trade, and lagging vaccination timetables, particularly in poor countries. COVID-19 continues to pose the greatest threat to the outlook for trade, as new waves of infection could easily undermine any hoped-for recovery.

"The strong rebound in global trade since the middle of last year has helped soften the blow of the pandemic for people, businesses, and economies," WTO Director-General Ngozi Okonjo‑Iweala said. "Keeping international markets open will be essential for economies to recover from this crisis and a rapid, global and equitable vaccine roll-out is a prerequisite for the strong and sustained recovery we all need."

"Ramping up production of vaccines will allow businesses and schools to reopen more quickly and help economies get back on their feet. But as long as large numbers of people and countries are excluded from sufficient vaccine access, it will stifle growth, and risk reversing the health and economic recovery worldwide," she said.

The Director-General added that trade through value chains has helped countries access food and essential medical supplies during the crisis.

"Manufacturing vaccines requires inputs from many different countries. One leading COVID-19 vaccine includes 280 components sourced from 19 different countries," she said. "Trade restrictions make it harder to ramp up production. The WTO has helped keep trade flowing during the crisis. Now, the international community must leverage the power of trade to expand access to life-saving vaccines."

 


Copyright 2021 Al Hilal Publishing and Marketing Group

You may also like