'First King of Dixit': Indian Man Tries to Colonize No-Man's Land Between Egypt and Sudan

Published November 15th, 2017 - 09:00 GMT
Dixit acknowledges that he is not the first person to proclaim the land as his own (Facebook)
Dixit acknowledges that he is not the first person to proclaim the land as his own (Facebook)

 

  • An Indian man claimed the no-man's land between Egypt and Sudan his own kindgom
  • Suyash Dixit traveled to the middle of the desert for six hours with permission from the Egyptian military
  • He posted on Facebook that the kingdom is "opening foreign investments to our country and nationality applications"
  • People have previously attempted to colonize the legally unclaimed territory including a man who wanted to make his daughter a real princess

 

An Indian man claims to have established his own kingdom after traveling to a no-man's land between Egypt and Sudan and declaring it his own.

Suyash Dixit 'founded' the Kingdom of Dixit on the unclaimed land of Bir Tawil, an 800-square-mile strip of land south of the Egyptian border.

While Bir Tawil is legally unclaimed territory, several people have attempted to colonize it over the years, including a Russian amateur radio enthusiast and an American man who wanted to make his daughter a real-life princess.

Bir Tawil, meaning 'deep well' in Arabic, is situated south of the border between Egypt and Sudan, but neither country wants to lay claim to it.

It is said to be the the only known land on earth where humans can live and survive but is not a part of any state or country
The discrepancy has meant Bir Tawil has stayed as a de facto 'no man's land' for more than 100 years.

Dixit traveled from his hometown of Indore, India, to Bir Tawil to declare himself the "first king of Dixit".

Boasting about his newfound royal status, he posted on Facebook that Dixit is "opening foreign investments to our country and nationality applications."

He writes: "I, Suyash Dixit, first of my name and the protector of the realm, declare myself as the king of 'Kingdom of Dixit'. I call myself, King Suyash First from today."

"I declare this unclaimed land of Bir Tawil as my country from now to the eternity of time."

 

 

In the Facebook post he also shares details of his journey to Bir Tawil, writing that he had to get permission from the Egyptian military to travel to the land.

"It was an epic journey starting from Abu Simbel at 4 a.m."

"We got it on three conditions: no photos of military areas (which is almost everything), you be back in the single day and you do not carry valuables."

"We drove for six hours straight in the middle of the desert and barren lands and crossing one military base to the location."

"In this epic voyage, there were times we thought the car just cannot make any far from here or we don’t have enough fuel now or we just don’t have time to cross that hill but a little courage and some math is all you need sometimes."

Upon arrival Dixit planted a seed on the land and planted his flag in two places, re-naming Bir Tawil the Kingdom of Dixit.

Dixit acknowledges that he is not the first person to proclaim the land as his own.

He continues in his post: "Now I know that some 5-10 folks have done it in the past as well but this is my land now (as I have officially planted the seeds following the rules) and if they want it back, there will be a war (over a cup of coffee at the Starbucks probably)!"

While Mr Dixit writes on Facebook that he is going to "write an email to the U.N.," he may struggle to fulfil his dream - and not only because of other people who already lay claim to Bir Tawil.

The United Nations has four criteria for statehood: a permanent population, a defined territory, a government and he ability to enter into relations with another state.

 

This article has been adapted from its original source.


© Associated Newspapers Ltd.

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