Museum of Umbria: Jordan Archaeology in Italian-Spanish Eyes

Published October 14th, 2020 - 10:48 GMT
The National Archaeological Museum of Umbria (Twitter)
The National Archaeological Museum of Umbria (Twitter)
Highlights
The Spanish-Italian mission in Jebel al-Mutawwaq indicated that the region is evidence climate change began hundreds of years ago, and is an important reference for other environmental studies of the Middle East.

The National Archaeological Museum of Umbria in central Italy opened an exhibition entitled “At the Origin of Urbanization” on October 9 showcasing the results of seven years of excavations by an Italian-Spanish archaeological mission in Jordan.

According to Italian news agency ANSAmed, the exhibition highlights the Spanish-Italian archaeological mission’s efforts to investigate architectural features of the Early Bronze Age dolmens of Jebel al-Mutawwaq in Jordan.

The exhibition includes 3D replicas of the site as well as plastic scale models of excavation areas of the necropolis and the settlement of the subsequent urbanisation of Levantine cultures of the Bronze Age.

The excavations of Jebel al-Mutawwaq, located on the top of a mountain along the Middle Wadi az-Zarqa in Jordan have helped reconstruct the socio-economic dynamics and religious practices in the Eastern Mediterannean at the end of the fourth millennium BC.

The Spanish-Italian mission in Jebel al-Mutawwaq indicated that the region is evidence climate change began hundreds of years ago, and is an important reference for other environmental studies of the Middle East.

According to the mission, the project’s aim is to investigate the architectural features of the Early Bronze Age dolmens of Jebel al-Mutawwaq and to collect material to help date the funerary structures. It also aims to delineate the relationship between the Early Bronze Age I settlement on the top of Jebel al-Mutawwaq and the megalithic necropolis on the slopes.

The mission’s experts stressed that repeated destruction suffered by dolmens of Jebel al-Mutawwaq and around Qareisan Spring, caused by modern agricultural activities, requires urgent archeological documentation work on the monuments and the Early Bronze Age village, along with the valorisation of the dolmen field and the settlement’s main buildings, which in the future risk disappearing completely.

This article has been adapted from its original source.     


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