#ExMuslimBecause sparks serious debate, cheap insults and everything in between

Published November 22nd, 2015 - 02:35 GMT
Many people are expressing their admiration for former Muslims telling of their experiences on Twitter, but others find the hashtag offensive.  (Twitter)
Many people are expressing their admiration for former Muslims telling of their experiences on Twitter, but others find the hashtag offensive. (Twitter)

Former Muslims have taken to Twitter using the hashtag #ExMuslimBecause to give reasons as to why they left Islam. Unsurprisingly, it caused multi-pronged storm across social media, with reactions from voices spanning the political spectrum and the globe.

The hashtag began as part of a controversial campaign by Council of Ex-Muslims Britain, which asked anyone who had left the faith to explain why they had done so. The organization’s spokesperson, Iranian-born Maryam Namazie, said she left the faith because she lived in an Islamic state—and "nothing could be worse."

Namazie was followed by a slew of other former Muslims, who tweeted explanations for why they left Islam. Reasons ranged from experiences growing up in a religious family, to questions about the compatibility of modern-day science and religion.

 

  

Perhaps it was inevitable the hashtag would prompt a mosaic of responses. Still, the sheer range of voices coming out were impressive.

There were serious discussions about apostasy in Islam, a subject often shrouded in controversy, with many Muslims believing that there is no compulsion in religion and others expressing more hardline views. 

There were the ring-wingers, whose attempts to hail the trend as a victory for Christian America were followed quickly by former Muslims' reminder that enemies of your enemies don't always make your friends. Then there was almost everything in between.

Here is a compilation, via Twitter.

Some praised the former Muslims for their bravery, especially as those who leave the faith have been targeted in the past and in some countries it is illegal to do so.

 

Others mocked the ex-Muslims, saying that they were only doing it to pander to white people.

 

Some Christian Twitter users thought the hashtag was an opportunity to speak about their religion.

 

But they were shut down by former Muslims who claimed that they disagreed with all religion.

 

And were told to stay away from a hashtag which had nothing to do with them.

 

Some believed that the hashtag was unnecessary.

 

Others took the opportunity to express their happiness in their faith.

 

Some were very defensive, even a little threatening.

 

But perhaps the most comforting were those who respected their decisions, noting that there is no compulsion in religion.


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