The familiar, sad symbolism of soldier vs. child

Published September 1st, 2015 - 03:45 GMT
An Israeli soldier forcefully holds down eleven-year-old Mohammed Tamimi, his left arm in a cast, during clashes in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh, August 28, 2015. (AFP/Abbas Momani)
An Israeli soldier forcefully holds down eleven-year-old Mohammed Tamimi, his left arm in a cast, during clashes in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh, August 28, 2015. (AFP/Abbas Momani)

A boy, a soldier - and a near catastrophe  

The story is known territory, one that's been covered thousands of times. But this time it is different and disconcerting, even for someone who has been on it for so many years.

Every Friday, after the main weekly Muslim prayers, there are demonstrations in Palestinian villages in the occupied West Bank against Israeli settlements.

And it's always the same scenario. Dozens of Palestinian, foreign and Israeli activists march from the village toward areas where Israel is building more settlements.

Continue reading on Correspondent

 

What I learned about language just by looking at a Turkish typewriter  

I love typewriters. Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise. Every conference room here at Medium is named after a typewriter company. At some point, I requested we make sure to have one with Turkish layout instead of an English one.

I don’t speak Turkish, and can’t read it either. I have never been to Turkey. I honestly don’t even know that much about Turkey. Why did I ask for a Turkish typewriter, then? Because it has one of the most fascinating keyboard layouts ever.

Continue reading on Medium

 

Provocative "sinner in Mecca" documents gay Muslim pilgrimage  

It is a rebuke of Saudi Arabia and its strict Wahhabi form of Islam, but it is also deeply personal -- a man trying to reconcile his faith with his sexuality.

From that perspective which includes footage of his wedding to his American husband in New York, millions of Muslims will likely find "A Sinner in Mecca" provocative if not offensive.

But director and pilgrim, Indian-born New Yorker Parvez Sharma, sees it as a wake-up call for a faith followed by nearly a quarter of humanity which he believes has been hijacked by a violent minority.

Continue reading on Your Middle East

 

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