A look at the treasures at risk in Palmyra

Published May 21st, 2015 - 11:38 GMT
As Daesh took full control of Syria's Palmyra on Thursday, countless treasures of the world heritage site are at risk.  (AFP/Joseph Eid)
As Daesh took full control of Syria's Palmyra on Thursday, countless treasures of the world heritage site are at risk. (AFP/Joseph Eid)

This is the immense beauty at risk in Syria's ancient Palmyra 

The capture of Palmyra, a former stopping point for caravans on the Silk Road, is the latest blow to efforts to hold back the advancing jihadists, following the fall of Iraq's Ramadi.

"IS fighters are in all parts of Tadmur, including near the archeological site," Syrian Observatory for Human Rights head Rami Abdel Rahman said, using the Arabic name for the city.

Source: Your Middle East

 

Washington asks, "Who lost Ramadi?" But Washington never had Ramadi   

The inside-the-Beltway debate set off by the fall of the Iraqi city of Ramadi to Daesh (ISIS, ISIL) on Sunday is, as usual, Dadaistic in its disconnection from reality. Republican talking points blame Barack Obama for withdrawing US troops from Iraq in 2011, as though Daesh suddenly began in 2012. The GOP figures typically don’t mention that it was George W. Bush who set the end of 2011 as the date for a total US withdrawal from Iraq, because that was all he could get from the Iraqi parliament.

Source: Informed Comment

 

Afghan workers are scapegoats for Iran's poor economy    

Iranian workers celebrated May 1 with much more enthusiasm and festivities than in previous years. For the first time in eight years, they were allowed to hold a peaceful demonstration, and to listen to their leaders and issue a declaration of their demands. However, the day and associated ceremonies were marred by slogans and protests against Afghan workers in Iran, particularly those working in the construction industry.

Source: IranWire

 

 

 

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