Turkey's upcoming elections explained in cat memes

Published May 27th, 2015 - 04:00 GMT
Turkey's upcoming general election, scheduled for June 7, will be important in determining the future of the country's democracy. (AFP/Bulent Kilic)
Turkey's upcoming general election, scheduled for June 7, will be important in determining the future of the country's democracy. (AFP/Bulent Kilic)

A cat meme guide for the upcoming Turkish general elections   

With the Turkish general elections less than a month away, campaigning by the major parties has reached a fever pitch.  The election will undoubtedly be one of the most important in Turkey’s recent history, directly affecting the health of the country’s democracy and its stability.

Many good, serious pieces have already been written about the variables involved in and possible outcomes of this election. Unfortunately, none of these articles have engaged with a central theme in the current political discourse. Of course, I am referring to the all-important Turkish phenomenon of the political cat meme.

Source: Muftah

 

A Sicilian and her cell phone save Syrians at sea 

It was an early morning in the summer of 2013 when the fragile-seeming Sicilian 27-year-old took the first panicked call: hundreds of Syrians were lost in the Mediterranean aboard a boat taking on water.

Caught unawares, she called the Italian coastguard, who quickly explained how she, a fluent Arabic speaker thanks to her Moroccan heritage, could tell the terrified migrants how to find their GPS coordinates on their satellite phone and ensure they could be rescued.

Source: Your Middle East

 

Forced confessions  

The Revolutionary Guards' Intelligence Unit obtained a forced confession from Jason Rezaian under duress in September 2014. An Iranian security official who withheld his name due to the sensitivity of the case told IranWire that the Guards pushed Rezaian to confess in order to “influence Iran's nuclear negotiations with Western powers, including the United States.”

Maziar Bahari’s 2012 film Forced Confessions pulls the mask off a regime that brutally extracts lies from its citizens – not criminals, but writers, journalists, and scholars. Bahari, who was forced to confess following his arrest in 2009, tells the story of the Iranian regime’s attempt to legitimize its rule through force. And, as the case of Jason Rezaian highlights, the regime continues to use this tactic to intimidate and isolate journalists for simply reporting the truth.

Source: IranWire

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