Egypt President vows to take action against 'terrorism' amid crackdown on pro-Morsi camps

Published August 5th, 2013 - 08:24 GMT
T-shirts bearing portraits of Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Morsi are put on display outside a tent during a sit-in organised by the Muslim Brotherhood in his support outside Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo on August 4, 2013. (AFP)
T-shirts bearing portraits of Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Morsi are put on display outside a tent during a sit-in organised by the Muslim Brotherhood in his support outside Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo on August 4, 2013. (AFP)

Egypt's interim President Adly Mansour pledged late on Sunday that his government will soon uphold a popular mandate to confront violence, stressing that "no one is above law."

Deposed president Mohamed Morsi will not be pardoned until a punishment is handed down, which is yet to take place, the head of state said in a phone interview on Al-Hayat satellite TV channel.

Mansour stated that Egypt's interim government will no longer allow protest camps by Morsi supporters, which have paralysed parts of the capital and thrown the country into deeper polarisation.

Egypt’s government is still seeking to offer all elements for a peaceful resolution to the political stalemate and will take action "at the right moment," Mansour said.

On 26 July, millions of Egyptians thronged the streets to heed a call by army chief General Abdel Fattah El-Sisi for a popular "mandate" to confront acts of "violence and terrorism."

The current president went on to stress that all those involved in crimes will be held accountable.

"No one is above law," Mansour added, saying there is "no going back."

All members of the National Defence Council – made up of civilian, security and army officials, and headed by the president – have agreed on ending the pro-Morsi sit-in protests, Mansour added.

Mansour, who was sworn in as Egypt’s caretaker leader on 4 July a day following the army's popularly backed overthrow of Morsi, affirmed the Egyptian government is not under any international pressure or dealing with foreign intervention in its domestic affairs.

International envoys, from the US, EU and Arab states, have visited Egypt amid ongoing attempts to broker reconciliation between the army-installed government and Morsi's Islamist allies.

Tensions have mounted in Egypt amid state plans to break up two mass pro-Morsi protest camps in Cairo, where thousands have gathered for more than a month clamouring for his reinstatement. The imminent dispersal has set off fears of a massive violent showdown.

Well over 200 people were killed in street violence since the army’s move to overthrow Morsi on 3 July amid wide spread protests against his rule. On 27 July, at least 80 pro-Morsi protesters were gunned down in clashes with security forces a short distance away from their major northeast Cairo sit-in.


© Copyright Al-Ahram Publishing House

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