Idlib's 'Tent Cities' Surge Due to The Recent Influx of Refugees

Published January 13th, 2020 - 09:59 GMT
A drone picture taken on January 11, 2020, shows a camp for the displaced on the outskirts of the town of Binnish in Syria’s northwestern province of Idlib. Resident's of Syria's last major opposition bastion welcomed a UN vote renewing cross-border aid to the country, as relief groups condemned restrictions to the programme which is helping millions. The United Nations Security Council on Friday voted to extend humanitarian aid to Syria, including to some of the most needy in the northwestern region of Idl
A drone picture taken on January 11, 2020, shows a camp for the displaced on the outskirts of the town of Binnish in Syria’s northwestern province of Idlib. Resident's of Syria's last major opposition bastion welcomed a UN vote renewing cross-border aid to the country, as relief groups condemned restrictions to the programme which is helping millions. The United Nations Security Council on Friday voted to extend humanitarian aid to Syria, including to some of the most needy in the northwestern region of Idlib. Omar HAJ KADOUR / AFP

Overcrowded population of tent cities in Atme town and Kah village, located in Idlib city of northwestern Syria, continues to surge due to the recent influx of migration.

Thousands of Syrians have been forced to flee their homes and take shelter in the tent cities since the Bashar al-Assad regime and its ally Russia launched attacks in November 2019.

Most of those looking for new settlements set their tents near local villages and camps in the hope of benefiting from easy transportation, water sources and humanitarian aid.

As for those unable to obtain tents, they have no option other than living in their relatives' tents until getting their own. One can see tents in which up to three families struggle to survive.

Atme and Kah camps, located near the southern Hatay province of Turkey, are two settlements that are second to none when it comes to observing migration.

Although there is a distance of some 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) between the camps, they are about to transform into a single compound as the recent migration wave pushed their capacity to limits with thousands of needy people in dire need of assistance.

Some 600,000 people currently take shelter in these camps which are filled with scores of scrappy tents and lack basic infrastructure.

Anadolu Agency's air footage shows that the tent cities are transforming into what could be described as a tent metropolis with hundreds of thousands of people in life struggle.

This article has been adapted from its original source.    


© Copyright Andolu Ajansi

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