Iran guard says no military site inspections under nuclear deal

Published April 19th, 2015 - 09:19 GMT
Iranian leadership has challenged several parts of the framework deal, most notably a stipulation calling for complete access to its nuclear sites by UN nuclear agency investigators, and a hold on lifting sanctions until the International Atomic Energy Agency has verified Tehran's compliance. (AFP/File)
Iranian leadership has challenged several parts of the framework deal, most notably a stipulation calling for complete access to its nuclear sites by UN nuclear agency investigators, and a hold on lifting sanctions until the International Atomic Energy Agency has verified Tehran's compliance. (AFP/File)

Inspections on Iran's miilitary sites will be prohibited under any new nuclear deal forged between Tehran and world powers, a senior commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guard told the Associated Press.

The Guard's deputy leader, Gen. Hossein Salami, said during an event on state TV that allowing foreign inspection on the country's military sites would be "selling out," and vowed that Iran would "not become a paradise for spies."

Iranian leadership is currently in the midst of forging a nuclear deal with the US, UK, France, Germany, China and Russia, whose initial framework outlines a scaleback of Iran's nuclear program in return for the lifting of international sanctions. A final agreement is meant to be reached on June 30. 

A fact sheet of the framework agreement in which one section calls on Tehran to grant the UN's nuclear agency access to what it calls "suspicious sites," has been a source of concern for Iranian leaders, who have also criticized a stipulation which states that international sanctions would only be lifted after International Atomic Energy Agency has verified Iranian compliance. 

Inan leadership has instead insisted the sanctions on their country on the day the accord is put into place. 

According to a fact sheet given to the news agency, Iran has agreed to the Additional Protocol to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, which would allow the IAEA unlimited access to both official and undeclared nuclear sites. 

But during the televised event Salami warned agaist Tehran's compliance with foreign inspection, saying the move would amount to "occupation" and expose Iran's military secrets and technology to foreign powers. 

Western nations have long bee suspicious of Iran's nuclear intentions, fearing they may be building supplies to build nuclear weapons instead of the civilian program aspirations they've publically outlined. While Tehran has repeatedly denied this and said its nuclear program is purely peaceful, the last time leadership allowed the IAEA to inspect a base was in 2005 at the Parchin military site. The move was largely seen as an attempt to gain the trust of world powers, but further visits by inspectors were denied by Iran, who sited espionage concerns. 

 


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