Is Theresa May Planning 2nd Poll in a New Brexit Deal?

Published May 22nd, 2019 - 07:45 GMT
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May delivers a keynote speech in central London on May 21, 2019. (Kirsty Wigglesworth / POOL / AFP)
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May delivers a keynote speech in central London on May 21, 2019. (Kirsty Wigglesworth / POOL / AFP)
Highlights
British Prime Minister Theresa May revealed her "new deal" on Brexit.

British Prime Minister Theresa May revealed her "new deal" on Brexit in a speech Tuesday, a last-ditch effort to leave the European Union with an agreement.

The proposal includes a temporary customs relationship with the EU. The bill could receive a vote in British Parliament by early June. If it fails to pass, May said she might step down.

"This deal is not the final word on our future relationship with the EU, it is a stepping stone to reach that future," she said Tuesday. "This deal lays the groundwork and settles many of the core issues, but in the years ahead Parliament will be able to debate, decide and refine the exact nature of our relationship with the EU."

Parliament has rejected proposed agreements three times before, and so far talks with the Labor party haven't found a compromise. The Labor Party continues to push for a customs union with the EU and alignment with the single market.


Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn said the new deal is a "rehash."

"On key elements -- customs, market alignment and environmental protections -- what the prime minister calls her new Brexit deal is effectively a repackaging of the same old bad deal, rejected three times by Parliament," Corbyn said.

May faces opposition from members of her own party who don't want to give in to Labor demands, including House of Commons leader Andrea Leadsom.

A spokesman for May "alternative arrangements, workers' rights, environmental protections and further assurances" are being discussed.

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry accused May or engaging in "political theater" and conservative lawmaker Andrew Percy said he's concerned that May left open the possibility of a second referendum.

Britain's deadline to leave the EU, which has been moved multiple times, is Oct. 31.

"The biggest problem with Britain today is its politics. And we can fix that," May said. "With the right Brexit deal, we can end this corrosive debate."

This article has been adapted from its original source.


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